Kit asked in Arts & HumanitiesPhilosophy · 9 years ago

What is the deepest thing you have learned from studying the works of Kierkegaard and Nietzsche?

Only answer if you've read books that they have written please. I get impatient with shallow answers.

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  • j
    Lv 7
    9 years ago
    Favorite Answer

    Deepest thing learned by studying Kierkegaard: Kierkegaard has a complete symbol system for life: the "three spheres." The Aesthetic or existential sensory sphere; contemporaneous with it are the Philosophic and Spiritual (religious) spheres. The philosophic develops as discerning and choosing good and bad among existential experience; the spiritual develops in the sense of "God is in this and I knew it not." (Jacobean ladder of Ideas/Angels informing caring awareness.)

    Deepest thing learned by studying Nietzsche: Nietzsche's life arc begins with a Biblical orientation (reading Bible passages to his fellow grammar school students); then, a major unexpected loss of his beloved Pastor father ("God is dead"), and then a precognitive dream of his younger brother suddenly dying (which sadly came true).

    Then, Nietzsche writes good poetry to "the Unknown God." Karl Jaspers studied Nietzsche's poetry and concluded it foretold Nietzsche's life path. Then, Nietzsche moves from God-attunement to philological Greek, does brilliantly. Then, reading Schopenhauer, finds a "father" figure whose work shapes Nietzsche's work. Then, finds "father" figure Wagner. Then, toward the end of his days, creates his Father figure Zarathustra, who gives "tough love" to the younger seeker. Then, has a "breakdown with compassion" (crying for the suffering horse), and completes his life's arc dressed in fine white linen robe, meekly following his mother around their home.

    His "God is dead" awareness was more a reprise of his own suffering, i.e. loss of Pastor father, coincident with his concern that European Christianity was waning, and it would be replaced by herd mentality. Hence his "overcomer" is similar to Abraham Maslow's "self-actualizer." http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Abraham_Maslow Somewhat "emo."

    p.s. "Bringing Up Girls," James Dobson, and "For Women Only," Shaunti Feldhahn, are worth reading. Reviews at http://www.amazon.com

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  • Anonymous
    9 years ago

    I read all of Kierkegaard's books back in the 1960s so I have to rely on the UC Berkeley lectures of Herbert Dreyfus, Philosophy 7 class on iTune's University podcasts. Herbert uses Kierkegaard to illustrate the difference in the ethics of the Greeks and the Hebrew, the two cultures that make up Western Civilization both beliefs and thought. Professor Dreyfus talks about the abandonment of ethics in the story of Abraham being commanded by God to sacrifice his only son. Kierkegaard writes about this in his book "Fear and Trembling". It is pretty intense and illustrates that our emotions are the foundation of our values and not thought or logic.

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  • 9 years ago

    That I could never pronounce their names!

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  • Anonymous
    9 years ago

    EWWW

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