Anonymous
Anonymous asked in HealthDiseases & ConditionsSkin Conditions · 9 years ago

Lichen Simplex Chronicus on Scrotum Please Help?

Hi, I am a 20 year old male with lichen simplex chronicus on my scrotum. I have had it for two years now. I used to scratch my scrotum daily for about two years and the condition developed on the edges. I have gone to a doctor and have tried many prescription medications for eczema, and topical steriods to decrease the symptoms. These did not cure the condition. I am looking for a herb or natural cream to get rid of the condition. I put tea tree oil on it for two weeks and it improved my skin, but it didnt make the condition go away. I currently put Aveno lotion on it daily. Also I am using a Naeem cream daily. If anyone could please suggest any herbs, creams, or any advice that would be greatly appreciated. I understand natural remedies may take some time to be effective, but I am willing to wait.

Thanks in advance.

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  • 9 years ago
    Favorite Answer

    Lichen Simplex Chronicus is also known as neurodermatitis. Your doctor may recommend the following, which you should try:

    Prescription medication. Oral or topical corticosteroids and oral antihistamines may be necessary to reduce the inflammation and relieve the intense itching. Antidepressants or anti-anxiety medications may be helpful for some people. If you develop a bacterial infection in the rash, your doctor may prescribe an antibiotic lotion or oral antibiotics.

    Wet dressings. This involves applying medicated cream to affected areas and then covering these areas with damp cotton material that has been soaked in water or other solutions. The moisture in the wet dressings helps the skin absorb the medicated cream. Covering the area with a plastic tape containing medication in the adhesive, or a tape applied over skin treated with a corticosteroid cream or ointment can also be helpful. Change the tape every 24 hours, or at whatever interval your doctor recommends.

    Counseling. A counselor can help you learn how your emotions and behaviors can fuel — or prevent — itching and scratching.

    The following are ways you can lessen the itch and irritation caused by neurodermatitis.

    Try over-the-counter (nonprescription) creams or medications. Apply an anti-itch cream or lotion to the affected area. A nonprescription hydrocortisone cream can temporarily relieve the itch. A nonprescription oral antihistamine, such as diphenhydramine (Benadryl, others), may be helpful if itching is severe.

    Cover the affected area. Bandages or dressings can help protect the skin and prevent scratching. This may be especially important if you scratch during your sleep.

    Keep your nails trimmed. Short nails may do less damage to the skin, especially if you tend to scratch while you're asleep.

    Take cool baths. Sprinkle the bath water with baking soda, uncooked oatmeal or colloidal oatmeal — a finely ground oatmeal that is made for the bathtub (Aveeno, others).

    Wear smooth-textured cotton clothing. This will help you avoid irritation.

    Choose mild soaps without dyes or perfumes. Be sure to rinse the soap completely off your body. And after washing, apply an unscented moisturizer to protect your skin.

    Keep stress under control. Stress and anxiety can trigger itching.

    Read what the Mayo Clinic says about the condition.

    http://www.mayoclinic.com/health/neurodermatitis/D...

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  • 3 years ago

    Lichen Simplex Chronicus Treatment

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  • 4 years ago

    This Site Might Help You.

    RE:

    Lichen Simplex Chronicus on Scrotum Please Help?

    Hi, I am a 20 year old male with lichen simplex chronicus on my scrotum. I have had it for two years now. I used to scratch my scrotum daily for about two years and the condition developed on the edges. I have gone to a doctor and have tried many prescription medications for eczema, and topical...

    Source(s): lichen simplex chronicus scrotum help: https://shortly.im/R3z28
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  • Gail
    Lv 4
    4 years ago

    The practical measures to be considered include general hygienic measures, diet, in-vestigation for presence of septic foci in the body, medicines and external applications, and physical treatment. General Hygiene. In acute or extensive skin eruptions the patient is best in bed, which provides rest, and makes the application of remedies easier. The bowels should be kept opened regularly, saline aperients being generally suitable. Hard water is often irritating to the skin, but artificial water-softeners, such as bath salts, are often unsuitable. Soap should be avoided in irritative conditions Diet must be suitable, nourishing and well balanced, with avoidance of items known to disagree, as for example, shell fish in cases of urticaria, or alcohol in acne or rosacea. Baths. Prolonged immersion baths are sometimes used for the treatment of dermatitis. Over-the-counter oatmeal or cornstarch preparations mixed into a warm bath may soothe the skin and relieve itching. Take care not to stay in the bath too long, because lengthy immersion can strip sensitive skin of essential oils. n For dryness, rub petroleum jelly or vegetable shortening on affected areas after a bath, or use a topical ointment containing aloe (Aloe barbadensis) or zinc. n Avoid eating potential allergens, such as milk, eggs and wheat. You may et help from supplemental vitamins A, B complex, and E, as well as zinc.

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  • 4 years ago

    Living with eczema at any stage in life, whether during childhood or adulthood, can evolve into a severely troublesome skin problem that can take a toll on your physical and mental health. Learn here https://tr.im/WirlF

    Recurring itchy, dry skin can turn to damaged, red, and raised patches that can lead to agony and embarrassment

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