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Where in the U.S. Constitution does it say that the U.S. is a Christian nation?

The Constitution is the document that defines the United States. If the Constitution does not state that the U.S. is a Christian nation, then it cannot be considered a Christian nation. At best, it is a non-denominational country in which Christianity is but one of many religions practiced by its citizens.

The second most important in U.S. history is the Declaration of Independence. The Declaration makes no mention of Christianity. The only religious reference is the generic statement "endowed by their Creator." But, each religion has its own concept of the Creator.

And, please, don't say that the Founding Fathers were Christians therefore they intended the U.S. to be a Christian nation. Many of the Founding Fathers were Deists, not Christians.

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  • 9 years ago
    Favorite Answer

    Short answer: nowhere.

    The First Amendment is very specific about there being no establishment of any 1 religion. The purpose of course is to respect every person's right to worship God in their own way, or not worship God at all, or worship whatever they choose to worship. So long as they don't hurt anyone else in the process.

    It would appear that many of the fundamentalists out there presume the US was founded as a Christian nation. Far from it. It was founded as a secular nation.

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  • Anonymous
    9 years ago

    It doesn't say that anywhere. It's only a general assumption because the founding fathers were very religious so it has mentions of God in many documents and on many monuments and things like that. Besides the VERY FIRST amendment says that everyone has their own freedom to religion and the Constitution is considered the supreme law of the land, as said by the "Founding Fathers". Also mostly all the people who immigrated to the New World came here because their religions weren't being respected. So, no NOWHERE does it say that the United States is a Christian country.

    Source(s): went to DC and had a very enthusiastic teacher teaching American history
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  • 9 years ago

    America is not a Christian nation. Just turn on the tv, walk to the ghettos, listen to people's everyday conversations. I don't care what the founding fathers said it was. You will know a tree by its fruit. An apple tree yields apples, not oranges. If this is a Christian nation, why aren't we all standing up to live a Christ-like life? It's because we're not a Christian nation. You go to the middle eastern nations, over 95% percent of them are Muslim or w/e...You can tell...no questions about it...if we were a Christian nation, you could tell...no questions...we wouldn't have to search the constitution.

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  • 9 years ago

    Your original assumption is wrong. The Constitution doesn't define the United States if we accept that actions matter more than words. Your main point is right though. No power was ever given to any specific religious doctrine within the constitution. On the contrary, as you know, the 1st amendment does quite the opposite.

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  • 9 years ago

    "We hold these truths to be self-evident, that all men are created equal, that they are endowed by their Creator with certain unalienable Rights, that among these are Life, Liberty and the pursuit of Happiness". Second paragraph of the Declaration of Independence. No follower of any other major world religion would have believed in these words nor would they have set them forth a principles upon which to lay a foundation for government. The founding fathers, however, in their wisdom, did not establish a "state church" - an institution from which they fled to the New World. Hence, Americans can worship (or not worship) as they choose. Governments are, though, to be agents of the Lord, deriving their ultimate authority from Him and establishing laws that reflect His righteousness and moral principles.

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  • 9 years ago

    If you were to talk to the founders today, I believe that they would say the nation was founded on Christian principles of the time, but that the basis of those principles, morality, is the essence of what it would take to keep the nation great. Benjamin Franklin famously remarked that the Founding Fathers had given us "a republic, if you can keep it."

    Thomas Jefferson said "[My views on Christianity] are the result of a life of inquiry & reflection, and very different from that anti-Christian system imputed to me by those who know nothing of my opinions. To the corruptions of Christianity I am indeed opposed; but not to the genuine precepts of Jesus himself. I am a Christian, in the only sense he wished any one to be; sincerely attached to his doctrines, in preference to all others; ascribing to himself every human excellence; & believing he never claimed any other."

    John Adams “Our Constitution was made only for a moral and religious people. It is wholly inadequate to the government of any other.”

    There are so many flavors of Christianity today, that you would be hard pressed to claim which one this country is "based" on. However, the total lack of morality, ie, the pure corruption, of our leaders is clearly taking us down the wrong path and destroying the country as predicted nearlo 250 years ago.

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  • Anonymous
    9 years ago

    The founding fathers were mostly Christians, but were smart enough to realize that EVERY religion had a right and a place in this nation. Do not let the fundies hijack this great nation.

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  • aquino
    Lv 4
    4 years ago

    It does not say that interior the form. It does not say on the McDonald's menu that nutrition could be extreme in energy, incorporate a lot of grease, and be served with a surly attitude. in spite of the undeniable fact that, that coverage needless to say shines through at McDonald's. John Locke replaced into an influential Christian logician and logician, and his writings heavily prompted the Founding Fathers. They quote him generally of their own writings. Locke recommended freedom of concept, God-given rights, and the equality of adult males, all innovations that he have been given from Jesus. those innovations have been included into the form by technique of adult males who prominent Locke's innovations. those ideals, form of like the greasy outlook at McDonald's, shine for the duration of the rfile that replaced into used to chanced in this usa.

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  • 9 years ago

    There is a vague mention of a creator but, it is clear that it is document written to give the people a government and that people will grant and protect the people rights and those right will be determined by the people no some disembodied spirit.

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  • 9 years ago

    it doesn't say it in the us constitution

    the founding fathers founded the laws on christianity they even say so in their own words

    john adams

    "We have no government armed with power capable of contending with human passions unbridled by morality and religion. Avarice, ambition, revenge, or gallantry, would break the strongest cords of our Constitution as a whale goes through a net. Our Constitution was made only for a moral and religious people. It is wholly inadequate to the government of any other." --October 11, 1798

    "I have examined all religions, as well as my narrow sphere, my straightened means, and my busy life, would allow; and the result is that the Bible is the best Book in the world. It contains more philosophy than all the libraries I have seen." December 25, 1813 letter to Thomas Jefferson

    "Without Religion this World would be Something not fit to be mentioned in polite Company, I mean Hell." [John Adams to Thomas Jefferson, April 19, 1817] |

    Benjamin Franklin: | Portrait of Ben Franklin

    “ God governs in the affairs of man. And if a sparrow cannot fall to the ground without his notice, is it probable that an empire can rise without His aid? We have been assured in the Sacred Writings that except the Lord build the house, they labor in vain that build it. I firmly believe this. I also believe that, without His concurring aid, we shall succeed in this political building no better than the builders of Babel” –Constitutional Convention of 1787 | original manuscript of this speech

    “In the beginning of the contest with Britain, when we were sensible of danger, we had daily prayers in this room for Divine protection. Our prayers, Sir, were heard, and they were graciously answered… do we imagine we no longer need His assistance?” [Constitutional Convention, Thursday June 28, 1787]

    In Benjamin Franklin's 1749 plan of education for public schools in Pennsylvania, he insisted that schools teach "the excellency of the Christian religion above all others, ancient or modern."

    In 1787 when Franklin helped found Benjamin Franklin University, it was dedicated as "a nursery of religion and learning, built on Christ, the Cornerstone."

    Thomas Jefferson:

    “ The doctrines of Jesus are simple, and tend to all the happiness of man.”

    “Of all the systems of morality, ancient or modern which have come under my observation, none appears to me so pure as that of Jesus.”

    "I am a real Christian, that is to say, a disciple of the doctrines of Jesus."

    “God who gave us life gave us liberty. And can the liberties of a nation be thought secure when we have removed their only firm basis, a conviction in the minds of the people that these liberties are a gift from God? That they are not to be violated but with His wrath? Indeed I tremble for my country when I reflect that God is just, and that His justice cannot sleep forever.” (excerpts are inscribed on the walls of the Jefferson Memorial in the nations capital) [Source: Merrill . D. Peterson, ed., Jefferson Writings, (New York: Literary Classics of the United States, Inc., 1984), Vol. IV, p. 289. From Jefferson’s Notes on the State of Virginia, Query XVIII, 1781.]

    your assumption it is not based on christian values is in error

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