Anonymous
Anonymous asked in Society & CultureReligion & Spirituality · 10 years ago

Christians, How do you interpret Romans chapter 2, verses 1 through 10?

Please be as specific as you'd like. Give references if possible, commentaries etc. Thanks in advance.

Update:

@ Unsolved Miseries, Thank you very much. :)

Update 2:

@ Neil, Thank you. :)

Update 3:

@PETER, Thank you. :)

Update 4:

@ Jim, Thanks for enjoining the gospel message with the text leading up to Romans 2:1-10. I am going to copy and file it for future reference. :)

Update 5:

@gatita, Thank you for that very significant commentary. :)

Update 6:

I would like to thank all of you for your excellent answers. in fact there is no one best answer as all are best answers! :) God bless all of you and your input was very much appreciated and very well received!

6 Answers

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  • gatita
    Lv 7
    10 years ago
    Favorite Answer

    All interpretations are in brackets at the end of each verse, God Bless! Verses 8-10 are self explanatory.

    Rom 2:1

    1 You, therefore, have no excuse, you who pass judgment on someone else, for at whatever point you judge the other, you are condemning yourself, because you who pass judgment do the same things. you who pass judgment. {Paul points out to the Jews that they too have sinned in similar ways.}

    2 Now we know that God's judgment against those who do such things is based on truth. based on truth. God takes into account all the facts before He makes a judgment.{ No human judge really knows all the facts, but only what is presented to him in court.}

    3 So when you, a mere man, pass judgment on them and yet do the same things, do you think you will escape God's judgment? {Judgment is worse when you judge others for the same things you do.}

    4 Or do you show contempt for the riches of his kindness, tolerance and patience, not realizing that God's kindness leads you toward repentance? God's kindness leads you toward repentance. Repentance can be forced by law or be led by grace. A thief can be forced to not steal by being thrown into prison, yet the thief is not changed on the inside. {Grace changes us on the inside.}

    5 But because of your stubbornness and your unrepentant heart, you are storing up wrath against yourself for the day of God's wrath, when his righteous judgment will be revealed. {Some people think that Christ’s death will lighten the judgment of God, but not so. To despise the grace of God by continuing to sin only reveals how great your sin is.}

    6 God "will give to each person according to what he has done." {Judgment is based on deeds not intentions.}

    7 To those who by persistence in doing good seek glory, honor and immortality, he will give eternal life. persistence in doing good. There is a need to persevere in your salvation. {Doing good is the obedience that comes from faith, not of earning salvation.} see 1:5

    8 But for those who are self-seeking and who reject the truth and follow evil, there will be wrath and anger.

    9 There will be trouble and distress for every human being who does evil: first for the Jew, then for the Gentile;

    10 but glory, honor and peace for everyone who does good: first for the Jew, then for the Gentile.

    gatita

    Apostolic Believer In One God, Jesus

    Source(s): Romans Chapter 2. Commentary by Tom Brown http.//www.tbm.org/romans_chapter_2.htm
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  • PETER
    Lv 4
    10 years ago

    Christians are to counsel one another lovingly so all can be molded and fashioned into Christlike individuals. However, one who undertakes to reprove every defect in another, while his own spirit and conduct are wrong, proves himself a hypocrite. As the apostle Paul stated: “Therefore you are inexcusable, O man, whoever you are, if you judge; for in the thing in which you judge another, you condemn yourself, inasmuch as you that judge practice the same things.” (Rom. 2:1) A wise reprover should begin at home and check matters he may be guilty of that could be as bad or even worse than those he observes in others. Jesus’ illustration demonstrated that our counsel should always be tempered with love, realizing that everyone, including ourselves, misses the mark of perfection in some way.

    Jehovah is “the God of truth.” (Ps 31:5) He is faithful in all his dealings. His promises are sure, for he cannot lie. (Nu 23:19; 1Sa 15:29; Ps 89:35; Tit 1:2; Heb 6:17, 18) He judges according to truth, that is, according to the way things really are, and not on the basis of outward appearance. (Ro 2:2; compare Joh 7:24.) Everything that emanates from him is pure and without defect. His judicial decisions, law, commandments, and word are truth. (Ne 9:13; Ps 19:9; 119:142, 151, 160) They are always right and proper, and they stand in opposition to all unrighteousness and error.

    From mankind’s original calamitous fall into sin up until now, Jehovah has shown himself to be a long-suffering God. His long-suffering before the Flood allowed time for due warning to be given and a means of salvation to be built. But his patience reached a limit, and the Flood came. Similarly today, Jehovah is showing great long-suffering, and this is lasting longer than some may have anticipated. However, that is no reason to give up. To do so would be tantamount to criticizing God for being long-suffering. Paul asked: “Do you despise the riches of his kindness and forbearance and long-suffering, because you do not know that the kindly quality of God is trying to lead you to repentance?”—Romans 2:4

    Of God’s Righteous Judgment. At Romans 2:5 “the revealing of God’s righteous judgment” is associated with ‘the day of God’s wrath.’ Therefore, God’s righteous judgment is revealed when ‘he renders to each one according to his works,’ everlasting life to those enduring in work that is fine and destruction to those obeying unrighteousness.—Ro 2:6-8.

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  • Neil
    Lv 7
    10 years ago

    1 You, therefore, have no excuse, you who pass judgment on someone else, for at whatever point you judge another, you are condemning yourself, because you who pass judgment do the same things. 2 Now we know that God’s judgment against those who do such things is based on truth. 3 So when you, a mere human being, pass judgment on them and yet do the same things, do you think you will escape God’s judgment? 4 Or do you show contempt for the riches of his kindness, forbearance and patience, not realizing that God’s kindness is intended to lead you to repentance?

    5 But because of your stubbornness and your unrepentant heart, you are storing up wrath against yourself for the day of God’s wrath, when his righteous judgment will be revealed. 6 God “will repay each person according to what they have done.”[a] 7 To those who by persistence in doing good seek glory, honor and immortality, he will give eternal life. 8 But for those who are self-seeking and who reject the truth and follow evil, there will be wrath and anger. 9 There will be trouble and distress for every human being who does evil: first for the Jew, then for the Gentile; 10 but glory, honor and peace for everyone who does good: first for the Jew, then for the Gentile. 11 For God does not show favoritism.

    Do not be a hypocrite. Do not reject the truth and do good. If you reject the truth and follow evil, you will be condemned. . And God does not show favoritism. He is just.

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  • 4 years ago

    you're taking very various of what's interior the Bible out of context. In different words, you at the instant are not thinking the scripture in its entirety. locate me a verse interior the Bible that mentioned that Jesus killed everyone individually. locate me a verse that mentioned any of his disciples did so individually. whilst the Romans & Jewish non secular leaders got here to arrest him, Jesus own disciple drew his weapon and struck off a slave's ear. Luke 22:51 indicated that he not in basic terms reprimanded his disciple for doing that yet he additionally healed the slave. If he sanctioned combating, he and all of his disciples could have all had swords and that they'd have started a slaying. Or for that count, he would have appealed to his father for legions of angels to strike down the adult men as you propose in Matt 26:fifty 3. the subject with an surprising many human beings is that whether they may be common in desirous to comprehend the Bible, they permit their own own emotions shade its genuine meaning and that they finally end up reading it to what they like it to signify.

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  • Anonymous
    10 years ago

    Quite simply, not a single person is greater than the other among Christians and in the world. We are individually as likely to fail, to err, and to sin as any other person. We are commanded to refrain from sin. We each have a rough road ahead of us, on that matter. Not a single one of us does not sin. Even when I try to obey, I still have a human mind that leads me into temptation. I should pray for the strength to make it out of all of this with my faith intact, as well as the discernment to know right from wrong. Everyone of us suffers from the same condition as the next person when it comes to sin. With that stated, we have our obligations to make good, sound judgments that are fair and right-minded that serve Him and help others. It is a good work that only faith makes possible. Our works cannot save us.

    To asker: You're welcome. I simply just thought it was best to put this in my own words, as best as I could.

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  • Jim
    Lv 7
    10 years ago

    The theme of the book of Romans is the Gospel of grace in Jesus Christ. Paul says in Romans 1:16 that the gospel is the "power of God for salvation."

    The word gospel literally means "good news". The good news is that Jesus Christ has made it possible for us to be declared righteous before God through His blood, and to be made righteous by our being united with Him in His death and resurrection, so that we can experience newness of life. The gospel is a free gift that is received by faith.

    In order to receive the gift of life through faith, one must first come to terms with the fact that they are a sinner who stands condemned before God because of their sin. A person who does not acknowledge their sinfulness is unable to receive this gift because they do not see the need for it. Therefore, Paul lays the groundwork for people to be able to see that they are in desperate need of forgiveness and redemption in Christ.

    He begins in verse 18 of chapter 1 by making the case that the irreligious man is without excuse before God because God has made Himself and His attributes evident through His creation and in the conscience of every man. But even though every man sees the miracle of God's creation and experiences the rebuke of His conscience on many occasions, still he turns away from this natural revelation to pursue a self-centered lifestyle of self indulgence.

    Next, Paul turns his attention to the moral man who thinks that he doesn't need Christ because he is good enough by virtue of his own efforts and good behavior. Paul makes the case that though these people might be given to looking down upon others for not living up to their lofty standards, that they are in fact hypocrites because these people do not even live up to their own standards. When Paul says that God "will render unto every man according to his deeds", he is looking at this totally from the negative perspective, in which God will render unto every man according to his sinful ways. Paul will make it abundantly clear in Romans 3:20 that no man is capable of being right with God on the basis of his own performance, when he says, "For by the deeds of the Law no flesh shall be justified in His sight, for through the Law comes the knowledge of sin."

    Good deeds cannot make us right before God because God demands absolute perfection. The purpose of the Law of God is to show us this truth. Anyone who attempts to live up to the high standards of the Law of God soon finds that he falls woefully short of the mark. Therefore, the Law is to show us our need for mercy and grace found in Jesus Christ alone.

    Romans 2:1-10 should not be looked at in any other way than as making the case that this particular class of people, those who think they are morally good, still fall short of the righteousness of God, and are in need of the grace of God every bit as much as the worst of criminals. There are many verses in chapters 2 and 3 that people tend to isolate in order to make them mean something that they were never meant to say. This passage must be read in the context of the larger argument that the apostle Paul is attempting to make in this section of Romans.

    In this case, context is everything.

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