^^ asked in Arts & HumanitiesBooks & Authors · 1 decade ago

What are some interesting themes in literature for you? (Includes novels, poems, films and what not)?

This is for a research paper, where we have to explore a particular theme. We need to use a number of different resources such as, films, poems and novels. My only problem with this is that I have to choose my own theme. I work better when given the material (the theme and the novel/film etc) since I become very critical of myself while in the process of choosing, so I'm asking around for some good ideas for themes (then probably draw from a hat). Also, if it wouldn't be too much of a pain, please include some texts in mind for the theme.

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  • LK
    Lv 7
    1 decade ago
    Favorite Answer

    Horror: What terrifies people the most?

    How did Bram Stoker's "Dracula" become Stephanie Meyer's "Edward"?

    How do they compare in both novel form and movies?

    (Both are in both forms, as you know.)

    How do the several films made from many books by Stephen King work?

    Is "The Shining" like the book King wrote?

    "Carrie"?

    "The Green Mile"?

    What makes people read these books and like them, or see the films and be scared or uplifted?

    Action/Mystery: What makes people identify with a protagonist/star?

    How did Steig Larsson's "The Girl With The Dragon Tattoo" and his following two books translate from novel form to the Swedish films already released about the trilogy he wrote? Why would anyone like the girl?

    (The films are on direct stream at Netflix if you use that, and they're better than the books, in my opinion.)

    How did Robert Ludlum's Bourne become blockbuster movies starring Matt Damon as an amnesiac who knows exactly how to kill and how to survive in a world he struggles with in constant motion?

    Are the movies like the novels? How are they and how are they not?

    How can anyone identify with that main character?

    How about Patricia Highsmith's novels about Tom Ripley?

    There are two movies made from the series of seven she wrote about Ripley.

    One stars Matt Damon as Ripley, the other stars John Malcovich as Ripley.

    Which seems more like Highsmith's view of her protagonist? What makes anyone identify with him?

    You'll get many more answers, I'm sure.

    Good luck.

    Source(s): Knowledge of those books and movies.
  • 1 decade ago

    I would suggest the theme of destiny/fate, especially since it is an important part of every archetypical hero's journey. The concept of destiny can be complex, especially when the concept of destiny vs. free will is taken into consideration. This can be as simple as saying that a character is destined to fall in love with one person (their soul mate) or as complex as watching a story such as the Greek tragedies unfold (in which a person's fate is foretold and the character attempts to exert his free will, only to put into play the fate that they were attempting to avoid).

    -Star Wars - It is the destiny of the main character to destroy the Sith.

    -Harry Potter - A prophecy made before he was even born shapes his entire life.

    - Oedipus - The main character was sent away after a prophecy said he would kill his father and marry his mother. He is later given the same prophecy. Every character attempts to avoid this fate but it is by trying to avoid this fate that he ultimately meets his doom.

    - The short story "The Monkey's Paw" deals heavily with the idea of fate/destiny

    - The play MacBeth almost entirely deals with the ideas of fate and destiny

  • 1 decade ago

    for me I always like watching people go through hell just to be with the one they love.

  • Anonymous
    5 years ago

    go ask alice. were reading it in my 10th grade honors class. it has all of these things

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  • 1 decade ago

    -Questions about life itself

    -self-identity

    -human nature

    -destiny

    -humanity

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