Why do RED and VIOLET light appear similar in our brains when they're at opposite ends of the visual spectrum?

What we perceive as colors is all in our brains. The colors RED and VIOLET appear very similar to us humans. However, if we look at the visual spectrum of light, we see that the order of colors according their frequencies is as follows: Red Orange Yellow Green Blue Violet As you can see (no pun intended)... show more What we perceive as colors is all in our brains. The colors RED and VIOLET appear very similar to us humans. However, if we look at the visual spectrum of light, we see that the order of colors according their frequencies is as follows:

Red
Orange
Yellow
Green
Blue
Violet

As you can see (no pun intended) Red and Violet are practically at opposite ends of the visual spectrum. So... considering they vibrate at very different frequencies, why do they look so similar in our brains?

My suspicion is that maybe the frequency of Red and the frequency of Violet might be similar to octaves in music. For instance, in music you can play an "A" note in the middle of the piano which vibrates at 440 Hz or you can play an "A" note at at other places on the piano such as 880 Hz. They sound similar to our brains because the frequencies are multiples of one another. So we call them both "A" notes even though their sound waves vibrate at different frequencies.

Can this principle be applied to light as well? Is the frequency of RED light some multiple of the frequency of VIOLET light? Is that why we perceive those colors as being similar even though they are at opposite ends of the visual spectrum?
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