What is "on-die graphics"?

what does "on-die graphics" mean in the following description of Toshiba notebooks?:

"Toshiba brings several new models to its Satellite C665D series featuring AMD’s Fusion E-series Accelerated Processing Unit (APU) with on-die graphics".

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  • Jamfo
    Lv 6
    9 years ago
    Favorite Answer

    It means that the Graphics Processor (the GPU or what is commonly referred to as the graphics card) is pressed directly onto the same chip that the CPU is on. The "die" is the device used to press the chips at the factory... so in this case, the "on-die graphics" are simply graphics "circuits" pressed onto the same chip as the main CPU. This is a way of integrating graphics technology into a system more cheaply.

    Before systems with on-die graphics, you had two methods to get a graphics chip into your computer. Either the chipset manufacturer would add a graphics processor to the motherboard's bus chipset (this would be an Integrated chipset) or you could purchase a discrete, stand-alone graphics card that contained it's own graphics processing unit.

    The thought process now is that the on-die graphics (those pressed onto the same chip as the CPU) offer a performance boost over the integrated chipsets used in the past. So you're starting to see CPUs with this feature... the Fusion series from AMD and the Core i5 series from Intel.

    While better than standard integrated graphics, neither of those will be able to touch the types of performance you'll receive from a stand-alone, independent graphics card. Stand alone cards have their own processors and dedicated memory... things a shared chip cannot compete with.

    I hope that made sense! I've included a link to an article which explains the process even more if you care to read more.

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  • eric e
    Lv 5
    9 years ago

    I'm pretty sure it means there's an accelerated graphics 'card' on the chip. I could be wrong, but that's what it sounds like.

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