Is AIKIDO's strength for self defense in defense or tweaking it to be more aggressive?

People that usually give Aikido a chance as a self defense system, usually talking about tweaking it and use it aggressively. They advocate using strikes, bone breaks, hard falls, chokes, and the like, that are opposite of Aikido's passive/defensive philosophy. To me, if you do this to Aikido, it makes it... show more People that usually give Aikido a chance as a self defense system, usually talking about tweaking it and use it aggressively. They advocate using strikes, bone breaks, hard falls, chokes, and the like, that are opposite of Aikido's passive/defensive philosophy.

To me, if you do this to Aikido, it makes it like every other martial art out there. It makes it something it isn't. Doesn't that take away it's strength then? Isn't this like making Karate a primarily grappling art (something it isn't)?

Isn't Aikido's strength in being defensive? To wait for the attack? To escape whenever possible? To difuse the situation with soft words/actions if possible? To restrain (if all possible) over seriously injuring? Isn't this where Aikido becomes unique and it's real strenght lies in self defense?

Or do you have to just get real, and tweak it to be a semi aggressive smash them up, bone breaking, violent art?
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