Mark asked in Society & CultureLanguages · 9 years ago

i need the correct Latin translation please ?

hi guys i need the correct latin translation for

LEARN FROM YESTERDAY ,LIVE FOR TODAY,HOPE FOR TOMORROW

i have used the internet and it came up with two different translation one being

DISE A HERI HODIE VIVUNT SPERA PRO CRAS and the other is

PERCEPTUM EX YESTERDAY AGO PRO HODIE SEPERO CRAS

please can you help me translate this or help me to find a new and correct translation mannt thanks

3 Answers

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  • 9 years ago
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    That's tougher than it first looks because of the idioms involved. You can't just translate the words for an idiom - what you end up with is meaningless in the second language. The thought in 'live for today' is basically to not worry about the future. Latin didn't have (or I have not found) a comparable idiom other than 'Carpe diem' When you say 'learn from yesterday', you really mean 'learn from the past.' Same concept for 'tomorrow' - 'hope for the future.'

    Also, what you have and what Pablo has proposed don't work grammatically. Heri, hodie, and cras are all adverbs. And, going back to the old grammar classes, adverbs can't be the object of a verb or a preposition - that has to be a noun. And there were substantive (noun) forms for all three. 'Tomorrow' is 'cras istud', 'yesterday' is 'hesternus dies' and 'today' is 'hodiernus dies'. For the latter two, the 'dies' part was often not used and the adjectives used essentially as nouns.

    For prepositions, the first point is that 'spero' does not need a preposition. The primary translation of 'sperare' is 'to hope for' - the preposition is inherent in the verb. Next, 'discere' takes 'de' in the sense of 'learn from' - not a/ab or e/ex.

    One more note. Latin used plural forms for both the past and the future - Romans looked on those as a series of individual evebnts rather than one thing.

    Disce de praeteritis et carpe hesternum et spera futura.

    Literally, 'Learn from the past and sieze today and hope for the future.

  • Anonymous
    9 years ago

    DISCE EX HERI, VIVE PRO HODIE, SPERA PRO CRAS

  • 4 years ago

    "Ante" has a temporal or local meaning, so, yes, this means "family before everything" or "family in front of everything", which is not what you want to say. The difference between "super" and "supra" is hard to explain, but in this case "supra" would be the right choice. So this is the right version: Familia supra omnia. By the way, word order doesn't matter, you can also say "supra omnia familia". Just take the one that sounds better to you.

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