Dreaming unable to breathe then waking up unable to breathe.?

For the last couple nights lately I'll be having a dream, not generally a nightmare, just kind of hanging out with people or doing something. I'll first, in my dream, start listening to my breathing and start seeing myself taking in breath through my mouth. Then it starts becoming really hard to breath in general. Like something is pressing on my neck. I stay asleep until I am almost panicking and crying. Then I'll wake up, take a gasping breath and then fall back asleep.

It's happened a couple times before, but I generally just ignore it. It's starting to really freak me out. Anything you can tell me will help!

Update:

Also, I am overweight, but it's not something that has affected me in the past, just recently. I have been losing weight.

I do not smoke, nor drink.

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  • 10 years ago
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    Are you overweight? do you smoke? how old are you ? do you have enlarged tonsils or adenoids? it might be obstructive sleep apnea .. read more about it!

    Source(s): Medical Student
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  • 10 years ago

    Thanks for the question. It sounds like your wife is having sleep apnea syndrome which represents disordered breathing which leads to partial (hypopnea) or complete (apnea) cessation of breathing. Two types of sleep apnea syndrome exist: obstructive sleep apnea (OSA), and central sleep apnea (CSA). OSA follows from upper airway limitation on airflow. CSA follows from a loss of central nervous system control or respiration. The definitive test is made with a PSG (polysomnogram) which is a sleep study. Treatment may include weight loss, avoidance of alcohol and sedatives. Surgical procedures called UPPP uvulopalatopharyngoplasty may be done. CPAP or continuous positive pressure airway pressure may also be used. The bottom line is it sounds like a sleep study should be done.

    This information is provided for general medical education purposes. PLease consult your doctor for diagnostic and treatment options.

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