Should I have hired a carpenter to install interior doors?

I hired a handyman to install five interior doors in existing door frames. The old doors were no longer available. These are just hollow, primed six-panel pressed woodgrain doors from HD. The doors needed to be trimmed for width and length. Although he said he had a power planer, it looks like he used it for... show more I hired a handyman to install five interior doors in existing door frames. The old doors were no longer available. These are just hollow, primed six-panel pressed woodgrain doors from HD.

The doors needed to be trimmed for width and length. Although he said he had a power planer, it looks like he used it for the side of just one door - that one was trimmed evenly. All the other trimming must have been done with his oscillating multitool. Those doors show saw marks/gouges and the cuts are uneven - if I hold a straightedge along the cuts, there are 1/16 to 1/8 and even 1/4 inch gaps; one door bottom looks concave, another looks convex, another is just wavy. I think enough material may have been removed that there isn't room left to fix them, if that's even possible.

I loaned him my router and jig to mortise the hinges. For two doors, the bottom hinge mortise didn't line up with the existing mortise in the door frame, so he chiseled one door frame mortise to make it longer, the other both longer and wider.

I trusted him to have the tools and skills to do the work when he accepted the job. I didn't look over his shoulder every minute. I didn't see these problems until I set up one of the doors for what I thought would be light sanding, then painting.

What do you think I should do? I can't do a lot of fixing myself due to a sore shoulder. To me, it looks like the doors are ruined. How would one fix a wavy, gouged cut?

Was it too much to expect a handyman to trim a door evenly, and leave it ready for light sanding and paint?
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