Anonymous
Anonymous asked in TravelAsia PacificPhilippines · 9 years ago

is there slaves in the Philippines?

i bought a pair of shorts today and they say "made in the philippines" i was wondering if they were made by slaves or children? if they are i will be very sad and i will probably consider taking them back.

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  • Anonymous
    9 years ago
    Favorite Answer

    In short, Yes.

    I daresay, but the majority of Filipinos refuse to accept or believe the very prevalent and significant problem of Forced Labor (Slavery) and Human Trafficking within the Philippines. And despite extensive government, NGO and international intervention, these problems continue unabated today. Sadly, the brunt of this activity is focused on children and women.

    The Philippines is ranked fourth among nine nations with the most number of humans trafficked both domestic and international for forced labor and prostitution.

    In an effort to deal with the problem, the Philippines passed R.A. 9208, the Anti-Trafficking in Persons Act of 2003, a penal law against human trafficking, sex tourism, sex slavery and child prostitution. Enforcement is reported to be inconsistent.

    Children

    Children were targeted for recruitment as combatants and noncombatants by the NPA and ASG. There were an estimated two thousand child soldiers in the country. By mid-year an International Labor Organization (ILO)-led program demobilized and reintegrated into society three hundred children. In a July 2004 report the Council for Welfare of Children estimated that children constituted between 13 to 18 percent of armed rebel combatants.

    According to UNICEF and ILO studies, approximately 2.4 million children were exposed to hazardous working environments, such as in quarries, mines, and at docksides. Since 1995, only four persons have been convicted of violating the child labor law.

    Trafficking in Persons

    Trafficking in persons is prohibited under a comprehensive 2003 antitrafficking law, which defines several activities related to trafficking as illegal and imposes stiff penalties--up to life imprisonment--for convicted offenders. Nonetheless, trafficking remained a problem in the country.

    The country was a source, transit, and destination country for internationally trafficked persons. Internal trafficking was also a problem. NGOs and government agencies estimated that from 300 to 400 thousand women and from 60 to 100 thousand children were trafficked annually. The most serious problem appeared to be the trafficking of women across international borders for purposes of sexual exploitation. Organized criminal gangs typically trafficked persons from China through the country to other destinations, although occasionally the country was the final destination.

    Both adults and children were trafficked domestically from poor, rural areas in the southern and central parts of the country to major urban centers, especially Metro Manila and Cebu, but also increasingly to cities in Mindanao. A significant percentage of the victims of internal trafficking were from Mindanao and were fleeing the poverty and violence in their home areas. The Visayan islands were also a source of trafficking victims. Women and girls were far more at risk of becoming victims of trafficking than men and boys.

    Prohibition of Forced or Compulsory Child Labor

    The law prohibits forced labor, including forced and compulsory labor by children; however, despite the government's efforts, there were some reports of forced and compulsory labor, particularly by children, mainly in prostitution, drug trafficking, and other areas of the informal sector. The legal minimum age for employment as a domestic worker is 15. However, an estimated 4 million children 17 years of age or younger, including many under 15, were employed. Some recruiters reportedly brought children to work in Manila or other cities under terms that involved a "loan" advanced to their parents that the children were obliged to repay through their work. The DOLE continued to address the problem of underage workers in family work settings by prosecutions and fines of violators

    The law prohibits the employment of children under the age of 15, except under the direct and sole responsibility of parents or guardians, or in cases in which employment in cinema, theater, radio, or television is essential to the integrity of the production. The law allows employment of those between the ages of 15 and 18 for such hours and periods of the day as are determined by the secretary of labor but forbids the employment of persons less than 18 years of age in hazardous or dangerous work. However, child labor remained a common problem, and a significant number of children were employed in the informal sector of the urban economy or as unpaid family workers in rural areas--some as bonded laborers. The most recent government survey reported approximately 4 million working children, approximately 2.4 million of whom were exposed to hazardous working environments, such as quarries and mines, docksides, and fishing boats, which are defined in the nation's laws as among the worst forms of child labor.

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  • 5 years ago

    WE HAVE house help here in the Philippines, they receive salary, have insurance, and SSS. Some of them stay for years that they are treated like family members. We dont consider them slaves. Those imported goods like shoes and clothes are made by salaried factory workers with employment benefits. sure Philippines is not perfect but we have laws that protect us workers.

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  • 9 years ago

    the wages in the philippine are very low, most workers earn less than $2 a day. many consider this to be 'slave wages' because they are not sufficient to support and feed a family, or to achieve economic stability from working. remarkably, many millions of filipinos do survive on these wages, and pity those who are unemployed, surviving on no incomes at all.

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  • 4 years ago

    Da Da Da We the Filipinos had been SLAVES!! Good day. Let's see why why why. Why do you consider we have now these last identify like Spaniards mmmmmm' We were the SLAVES no must deliver different nationalities over. What a query! You mean the false church buildings. False, wake up!! With all your IDOLS!!!!!!! Saints, False Christ. MARY! Christ is darkish no longer WHITE. REV 1:12 and down tells you clear if ya know easy methods to learn! And if ya don't have any one read it to you.

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  • Anonymous
    9 years ago

    No, there are no slave in the Philippines. However, there are a lot maids in here. But maids are different from slaves.

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  • kookie
    Lv 4
    9 years ago

    LOL. Children? Although I won't blame you for thinking that since I've read about Mac hiring and mistreating underage workers in China.

    Anyway, it's made here because labor here is cheap.

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  • Anonymous
    9 years ago

    25 years ago.(last time I was there) I would say "yes". It had nothing to do with making clothes...they were called "Bar Girls". Might have been the saddest thing I've ever seen. Would you believe 13 years old?? I do have my limits.

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  • 9 years ago

    There are slaves everywhere. In some places they give them another name.

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  • lolit
    Lv 7
    9 years ago

    gone are the days when there were aliping namamahay and aliping saguiguilid . slaves now are those working as domestic helpers , labors . factory workers .

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  • Anonymous
    9 years ago

    Oh... no sweetie, they're made neither by slaves nor children, i assure you.

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  • inday
    Lv 6
    9 years ago

    NO. There are no slaves here only maids, helpers,workers.

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