where can i get a LARGE hp electric motor?

i'm looking for a (or 2) large electric motor(s) to get a small car up to 75 mph if not faster. want to make an electric car for fun and only thing i need is the motor(s).

where can i BUY a (or 2) LARGE motor(s) that i can use in the car?

Update:

i'm looking at converting a dying 1996 chevey corsica

http://www.mycarlady.com/wp-content/uploads/2009/0...

i've learned to love these lil cars. bu honestly i was going to take the trunk and pretty much cut that out and change the axle into something like a motor bike. kinda.... haven't spent more then a few hours running this over. so i kinda wanted to know if motors were there and how much they would cost me to obtain....

Update 2:

with all said about the 10 hp moving me that much, what if i put 2 50+ hp motors in then?

4 Answers

Relevance
  • J.
    Lv 6
    9 years ago
    Best Answer

    If it is a small car, you can use aircraft starter generators from larger aircraft engines. If you add a well designed PWM control circuit, you can improve their performance, and that of even three phase industrial motorsif you wnet that route. Mosfets or IGBT's are the way to go, because the SCR's do not do well in DC applications unless there is a zero voltage crossing point long enough for them switch off.

    Part of the learning process is the acquisition process. Buying electric motors new is very expensive. Go price them through Grainger of Tractor Supply.

    If you have an industrial tool reseller or a large metal recycler, you might be able to buy form them at current scrap value plus a percentage. You may find it more desirable to be cost effective. An aerodynamic small car at 75 MPH is likely to need 15 HP of motor. You face a situation of a diminishing returns, as wind resistance really picks up after 55 MPH. A 10 HP listeroid diesel engine for example will move a geo metro 55 mph on a level stretch. This roughly translates to about 4 to 6 hp in an electric motor. As you add weight, and as you add speed, you increase current draw in a rather parabolic fashion when your wind resistance increases, or your mass increase significantly.

    If you utilize a CVT such as from a Mazda GLC, you can get better results than trying to direct drive axles from the motor shaft.

  • 9 years ago

    to get the Ford Excursion (or whatever you have) up to 75 only takes about 50 hp in the real world (less in theory). It's just slow.

    A couple of Netgain Warp 9 motors connected end to end by their shafts (one with the shaft sticking out both ends) ought to do it. Their continuous rated power is like 25 each. But they can put out 3 times that each, for short bursts. Take off from a stop would be better then the Triton v10, but after 15 mph the v10 is better. After 30 mph the 2 electric motors would start to feel like an under powered v6 or a strong 4 cylinder. After 60 mph it's just painfully slow.

    The DC electric motors like the Netgain are really strong at low rpm, but weaker at high rpm.

    You really need 4 motors, 2 motors end to end, direct driving each differential. Then you'll be putting out up to 300+ hp with full time 4wd. Then the truck would really move, especially off the line (not as fast as if you used a transmission, but still fast enough). Still a little slow from 50 to 70 though.

    You really need a better motor then the ones that are available to home builders. For some reason, all the best motors, like the Tesla Motors motor, and the UQM Powerphase 150, are available to OEM manufacturers only. They're both 3 phase AC induction motors. Their low rpm torque is less strong in proportion to their horsepower, but it's still pretty good, and they can rev higher and they have a wider power band. And they're both pretty got dam powerful.

    You can get 3 phase AC induction motors, like the HPGC AC50, or the Azure Dynamics AC55. But they're not nearly as good as the Tesla motor. They're really no better they their DC cousins. Less low rpm torque but higher reving, equal power to weight ratio, and they're more expensive. Their power does peak out at higher speeds, which is good for that portion of your driving, but not as good for the off the line take offs.

    They don't have sufficient torque to direct drive the differential, they require a transmission. But if you're using a transmission, the higher rpms don't make a bit of difference, you might as well pay less money for an equally powered, low reving DC motor.

    The Tesla motor has great low rpm torque and great top end power. That's the motor you want.

  • 3 years ago

    To get the Ford holiday (or anything you could have) as much as seventy five best takes about 50 hp in the real world (less in thought). It's just gradual. A couple of Netgain Warp 9 motors related finish to finish by means of their shafts (one with the shaft sticking out both ends) ought to do it. Their continuous rated power is like 25 each and every. But they can put out 3 times that each, for brief bursts. Take off from a discontinue would be better then the Triton v10, however after 15 mph the v10 is best. After 30 mph the two electric motors would to think like an beneath powered v6 or a robust four cylinder. After 60 mph it's simply painfully sluggish. The DC electrical motors like the Netgain are quite powerful at low rpm, however weaker at excessive rpm. You particularly need four motors, 2 motors end to end, direct riding each and every differential. Then you'll be placing out up to 300+ hp with full time 4wd. Then the truck would quite move, certainly off the road (now not as fast as in case you used a transmission, however nonetheless speedy adequate). Still slightly gradual from 50 to 70 though. You particularly need a greater motor then the ones which might be available to residence builders. For some purpose, all the high-quality motors, just like the Tesla Motors motor, and the UQM Powerphase one hundred fifty, are available to OEM manufacturers handiest. They may be each three phase AC induction motors. Their low rpm torque is less strong in share to their horsepower, but it surely's nonetheless pretty good, and they may be able to rev bigger and they've a much broader vigour band. They usually're both pretty got dam robust. Which you can get three segment AC induction motors, like the HPGC AC50, or the Azure Dynamics AC55. But they're no longer virtually as just right as the Tesla motor. They're relatively no better they their DC cousins. Much less low rpm torque but greater reving, equal vigor to weight ratio, and they're extra costly. Their vigor does top out at better speeds, which is good for that part of your using, however now not as just right for the off the road take offs. They do not need ample torque to direct pressure the differential, they require a transmission. But if you're utilising a transmission, the bigger rpms do not make just a little of difference, you might as well pay much less money for an equally powered, low reving DC motor. The Tesla motor has excellent low rpm torque and satisfactory top finish energy. That's the motor you wish to have.

Still have questions? Get your answers by asking now.