Red asked in PetsFish · 9 years ago

African Dwarf Frog behavior?

I have had this frog for several weeks and have noticed some unusual behavior. This morning the tank looked gross so I put my frog and my beta in a bowl and cleaned the tank. I filled it with room temp tap water and treated it with chlorine drops. Then put them back in. I figured they would be stressed and when I'm stressed I get hungry so I fed them. AND HE STOLE MY FISHES FOOD! From the surface, he just ignored his own food. An hour later he BIT MY BETA'S TALE! Now he's floating on top of the water every now and then and swimming back down. What's going on? Is this normal? I thought he might have gas so I did some research and found a disease called dropsy but he's not all that bloated like in the pictures. In fact, he looks as fat as any other pictures of healthy Frogs I've found.

This is what he looked like when i got him http://wrongcrowd.com/albums/aq-critters/dwarf_afr...

this is what he looks like now http://home.earthlink.net/~ecotank/sitebuildercont...

note: I don't have a camera, these are not pictures of my frog but close comparisons

Update:

aquella- thanks for that link, I took a close look at him and he is definitely an ADF.

7 Answers

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  • 9 years ago
    Best Answer

    It sounds to me as though you have an African Clawed Frog instead of an African Dwarf Frog. This isn't good because ACFs grow to be huge, (though they look very similar to ADFs when young,) and will eat anything that they can stuff into their mouths, including fish or fish parts. (Like tails.)

    Here's how to tell which kind of frog you have: http://allaboutfrogs.org/info/species/clawedordwar...

    The good news is that both of these frogs frequently float about at the water's surface. They're surface breathers and lazy.

    Good luck.

    Source(s): Experience.
  • 3 years ago

    African Dwarf Frog Behavior

  • 9 years ago

    Your African Dwarf Frog's behavior is normal. I see no indication that he is an African Clawed Frog another answer has suggested. Two things to remember about ADFs are these frogs have very poor eyesight and they breathe in air from the surface of the water. They won't eat something unless they can smell it, it moves right by their eyes, or they find it by accident. It is possible that when he went to the surface to get air, he gulped in some of the betta food as well and ignored his own food for the simple reason that he didn't yet know it was there. Biting the betta's tail is likely an accident as well. Sometimes what happens is the betta's tail moves right by the frog, so the frog may mistake it for food and latch on, then release when they realize it isn't food. I have had that happen with my ADF's and bettas before, but there is no need to worry as ADFs cannot usually eat the fish and generally leave them alone. I have had bettas and ADFs in the same tanks for many years and never had any real problems with it. However, if the tail biting continues, you may consider separating them. The floating at the surface is normal too as long as he is able to swim down and is not bloated. ADFs love to float at the surface. It is just their way of relaxing and being a bit lazy because they won't have to swim to the top for air if they just stay floating there.

    Source(s): Vet Tech student and owner of many fish and African Dwarf Frogs.
  • Tina
    Lv 4
    4 years ago

    For the best answers, search on this site https://shorturl.im/avQsp

    I keep my ADF tank at 78-80 degrees (fahrenheit). They seem perfectly happy with that arrangement. I think anywhere from 76-82 is fine - just don't go above 85 or below 74, I think that might stress them. Frog #1 seems perfectly fine. My frogs also used to swim up and down in corners, it is a nervous behavior (I think) and once they got used to their new environment they stopped. If he's stretching his legs, he might be hunting. Cute. :) Frog #2 seems a little odd, but considering that you only just got them, I wouldn't be too concerned yet. After three days it is highly likely that they're both still a bit frazzled. Frogs do have different "personalities" and maybe he just likes to float around and hide in the decor when he's stressed. :) Just see if the behavior persists. One way to know for sure that your frogs are eating is to train them to eat off of tongs/tweezers. I've tong-trained my frogs after I realized my girl frog was a pig and needed to go on a diet. This way I can control exactly how much they eat, plus it's really fun to feed them. How big is your tank? Good for you, not keeping them in those little frog cubes.

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  • Drake
    Lv 5
    9 years ago

    Any fish will steal food from another fish given the chance. Its in their nature to do so.

    However . . .

    I am hellishly paranoid of ADFs and bettas. I had a African Dwarf Frog with a betta once in a tank and the frog ignored its food. It ate instead my ghost shrimp, the live plant (roots and all), and then ripped off all my bettas fins in an attempt to eat the fish. My betta died of a secondary infection.

    With that experience under my belt, I would never do the combo ever again. I would put the betta and the frog in different containers and get rid of the frog. Or if you like the frog, get rid of the betta. Either way they need to be separated ASAP since your frog has displayed agressive tendencies towards your fish.

  • 4 years ago

    This Site Might Help You.

    RE:

    African Dwarf Frog behavior?

    I have had this frog for several weeks and have noticed some unusual behavior. This morning the tank looked gross so I put my frog and my beta in a bowl and cleaned the tank. I filled it with room temp tap water and treated it with chlorine drops. Then put them back in. I figured they would be...

    Source(s): african dwarf frog behavior: https://tr.im/uk7rg
  • Jane
    Lv 4
    4 years ago

    Sounds like the one swimming around is the dominant one. This often happens when several animals are kept together. Another possibility is that one is ready to breed and the other one isn't. If both get enough to eat and don't hurt each other, I wouldn't worry.

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