Big asked in Politics & GovernmentGovernment · 10 years ago

If the U.S. had a Jewish President, what would happen to our relationship with Saudi Arabia?

I've read that they do not allow Jewish people in Saudi Arabia.

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  • ?
    Lv 6
    10 years ago
    Favorite Answer

    That dis-allowance of Jewish people is subject to change if and when under the banner of the American flag. In fact, all such biases are suspended anyway in this instance when one flies under his respective country's flag.

    And so, this is not so complicated a matter as one would think. Actually, more dissension would chance to arise from within the USA itself than by any unrest demonstrated by nations outside it. A Jewish president would nonetheless be President of the USA, would he not? And thus he would necessarily pose no more an impasse in foreign relations than would a Catholic or Protestant president pose problems for countries that otherwise if quietly oppose Catholic and Protestant religions, respectively.

    What ensues between, say, Israel and Saudi Arabia cannot be directly allowed to cumber the internal and foreign relations and protocol of the USA; those as are established by the U.S. Constitution and the U.S. Congress, not any regarding those established by outside charters. What disdain these two nations share with each other must possess a certain limit with respect to dealings with the USA. We are neither Saudi nor Israeli people, but Americans first and foremost.

    Furthermore, we can say this. Not few middle eastern nations depend on American dollars or trade or both dispensed each year, and Americans depend on good relations with them for strategic purposes that go beyond relatively provincial feuds, which is to say that the world is more interdependent than it has ever been. Thus Saudi Arabia and the Jewish state both have ever to bear this in collective mind at the very outset in all their many dealings. Saudi Arabia is aware and sensitive to the vantage point that other middle eastern nations share with the USA: Egypt's good relations, and Iran's presently ambivalent relations but no less influential ones, which two nations are the big boys on the block in the middle eastern theater of foreign operations -- not Saudi Arabia ( though they have great oil reserves).

    But what you address here directly is to pose a speculation on that of a Jewish (American) president. And of that, we must accord the same opinion as outlined above. A President of the United States is foremost American -- the presidency is a geopolitical compass -- more vast in implication than that of any one ethnicity -- though we can easily make the argument that before Obama's tenure, all presidents were of Anglo-Saxon-Protestant ancestry, save one: JFK. Moreover, any foreign state that would demonstrate problems with a said Jewish president would just have to get over it; now, wouldn't they? -- think about it. Here's why. The USA comprises a population of over 300 million people, not just one individual, no matter that he were president or not, Jewish or not. Let us face it -- not the USA nor Saudi Arabia nor Israel can prove so in solidarity reflexively that any one could prove that all are of one mind -- which notion is preposterous -- as to dictate terms to the USA that if not heeded Saudi Arabia will threaten to shut down the whole workings throughout of all relations, foreign or domestic.

    While the USA does what it can or will to respect the traditions of respective foreign states, we should expect that they will demur to us by means of expressing that same sentiment regarding America's sensibilities as well. This is called astute statecraft, apt diplomacy.

    Ultimately, that a president were Jewish would prove inconsequential. Bear in mind that former Secretary of State Henry Kissinger is Jewish; and not few foreign dignitaries in the middle east knew this -- we were then as heavily reliant upon foreign oil from that part of the world as we are today. What ensues outside a given nation is wholly different from how protocol is administered within that given nation.

    Rest assured that if there were a Jewish American president, you can bet that some foreign high-ranking dignitary within Saudi Arabia would cool the heels of that respective Saudi Arabia's head of state for sake of getting on with things and keeping in step with the world at large, which increasingly moves faster and faster. Who inside Saudi Arabia does not know that their oils reserves, though presently large, are finite? They will not always share the upper hand, if for no other reason than technology advances may one day soon render Saudi Arabia's comparative advantage -- oil -- obsolete: dependency of gasoline and diesel has fastly become too unwieldy to sustain; and Saudi Arabia will need to fashion a new bargaining chip when the day of oil redundancy does finally come. Same can be said of Israel: America's present alliance with them will not always be amiable as it is today; guaranteed.

  • 4 years ago

    A "relationship" with Saudi Arabia is NOT something to be desired! If you think Bush is not to be trusted then why in the world would you worry about any having communication with a country that is a hot bed of terrorists activities plus is Wahhabi Islam...the MOST dangerous and blood thirsty form of Islam there is????? Make up your mind.

  • Anonymous
    10 years ago

    it wouldnt make any difference. saudi arabia bends to the will of the West

  • Zenos
    Lv 6
    10 years ago

    I think your question is a valid one. I think the Saudis would have a difficult time, at first, but eventually they would have to accept it.

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  • 10 years ago

    Nothing will change. The Saudis love our money.

  • 10 years ago

    Hopefully not much. But I could see other Arab/Muslim states throwing a hissy-fit about a Jewish president.

  • 10 years ago

    Jews are allowed they just are not allowed to hold religious services

  • Anonymous
    10 years ago

    He'd nickel and dime them.

  • 10 years ago

    not one thing

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