Anonymous
Anonymous asked in TravelCanadaOther - Canada · 9 years ago

Is my knowledge of Canada right? I need to choose a city. Could you help me, please?

I mean to move to Canada for good. I've spent a lot of time exploring by internet but I haven't decided which city to choose.

So I've gotten some general knowledge about Canadian cities. Check it out and leave comments please.

I'd prefer one of those below

(From the west to the east)

===========Vancouver=========

cons

overpriced real estate, everything overpriced, so if you don't have a well-paid work you aren't have any delight

some problems with public transport

a lot of homeless people

locals aren't friendly

rather high crime rate, the most widespread crime is autotheft

pros

mild weather, nice view

nearby skiing resorts

cheap sushi (TRUE?)

good health care

neutral

huge Chinese community, a lot of Indians

good cannabis

==========Toronto===========

cons

no skiing resorts nearby

locals are just a bit friendlier than in Van.

pros

developed public transport system, no need for car

moderate prices

various ways to spend spare time, lots of clubs

low crime-rate

good health care

neutral

Europeans is minority, lots of immigrants

bad cannabis

===========Montreal===========

cons

unemployment (is it high?)

French (nice but must be learned)

health care is not so good as in Toronto or Van

low crime-rate but residence burglary and bike-thefts are often

pros

people are friendlier than in both Vancouver and Toronto

some cheap small skiing resort nearby

cheap real estate,

low prices, various ways to spend spare time, lots of clubs

neutral

mostly Europeans, Arabs, Haitians

everyone drinks wine

==========Quebec-city===========

cons

scanty choice of places to spend spare time, almost no malls for example

small city (or town?)

only French (nice but must be learned)

high prices in the centre

health care is not so good as in Toronto or Van

almost no public transport

pros

low cost of real estate

locals are very friendly

no crime

no unemployment

some cheap small skiing resort nearby

neutral

lots of tourists

no cannabis, just Burgundian wine

=========== St.John's===========

cons

high prices

rather high unemployment (is it true?)

very scanty choice of places to spend spare time, no malls

almost no public transport

pros

the friendliest folks in the world

no crime

low cost of real estate

neutral

farawayness from everything

locals mostly of Irish descent

everybody drinks beer

===========Halifax===============

Bigger than st.John's but have rather high crime-rate

locals mostly of English descent

in other respects alike

Please add your information and say where I am wrong.

Update:

Charlie, that was first stage of course. And either of these cities fit me

11 Answers

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  • Lori
    Lv 7
    9 years ago
    Favorite Answer

    For Toronto you state Europeans are minority, lots of immigrants.....ummmmm Europeans ARE immigrannts.

    For Quebec and St Johns you state " no crime". Really? NO crime. You are pretty gullible.

    I find most of your "information" on Canadian cities a bunch of generalizations and stereotypes. Each city is beautiful in it's own way. Each city has it's share of nice and not-so-nice people. You will find whatever you expect to find. If you expect people to be unfriendly and move there with that mindset , then that is what you will find. If you have a positive outlook and expect friendliness, you will find friends.

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  • 4 years ago

    Big question. First off, I'd stick to one of the larger cities. It's easy enough to get out to the city, and most of the country is empty so I'd stay stick to a larger place that has 24 food and all the basic amenities. That essentially gives you Adelaide, Melbourne, Sydney and Brisbane. Adelaide and Melbourne get the most weather. Not so much snow, but cold and rainy in the winter. Sydney and Brisbane are essentially pretty nice year round. Of the two, I'd lean towards Brisbane. Sydney's the major city and acts like it. I found people there more image conscience and it's the largest population basis so the most different cultures. It's a very spread out city, with North and South Beaches, downtown and western suburbs. It sprawls similar to LA. Brisbane I found nice. It's definitely smaller but I found it a decent enough size. It's built on a river which oxbows around the city, and gives the downtown a nice feel. The added bonus for me is that Brisbane is close to a lot of nice places on the East coast, Byron Bay, Surfer's Paradise, Gold Coast and Noosa, Fraser Island and Agnes Water. A lot of nice places to take short trips to on weekends. If you don't mind the cooler weather then I'd look at Melbourne. I found it far friendlier than Sydney, I'd meet people every time I went out. It's a major city that has a lot to offer. I liked Adelaide as well, but Melbourne is a far livelier city, more multi cultral and it has the best club/night scene that I found in OZ. I'd look into buying a car or van while there. You can buy one cheap, second hand, there's a thriving market of cars being bought and sold by backpackers who come to OZ. If you're patient, you can find some real bargains, especially from people who's visas are running out and need to sell the car in the next 6 hours before getting on a plane. Finally, when it comes to Aussies, no worries. Yeah, there is some racism in OZ, but only in rare occasions is it a real problem. Mostly, it's sorta friendly, if that makes any sense. Aussies will give you grief whomever you are, and race is the easiest thing to make fun of. Watch the wedding scene from, "The Castle," as a good example of this. Mostly, I found Ozzies incredibly warm and friendly. The accent is easy to pick up as is the local lingo. There is also a large backpacker population, mostly European, but also from all other spots, so it's ease to travel around and take in some of the sites. I hope this all helps, let me know if you have any further questions. I spent a year in OZ and loved it there.

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  • sponge
    Lv 5
    9 years ago

    There are a couple other options to look at. It's odd that you've included Halifax and Quebec city but left out Calgary, Edmonton, and Ottawa, (the fourth, fifth, and sixth biggest cities in Canada; Calgary is actually more economically important to Canada than Vancouver). You've otherwise done a pretty decent summary of the cities. Calgary's not in the mountains but you can see them from there on a clear day, and Ottawa is near to Montreal and skiing if that's what you like.

    If you're looking for smaller cities as well, Victoria, Saskatoon, Winnipeg, London, Kitchener-waterloo? The prairies are generally very economically strong, fairly friendly, but the winters can be spectacularly long and cold. Southern Ontario is struggling economically, but is also fairly friendly, the weather is warmer, but put it this way, they had to call in the military this week to find some motorists that got lost in the weather on a major freeway.

    If you're going to live in QUebec you can't learn French while there. You need to be fluent before you start or you won't get a job.

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  • 9 years ago

    Avoid Calgary at all costs... as well as Edmonton, Saskatoon, Winnipeg etc... There are way too many hicks.... and in Calgary you'd have to deal with the stampede.

    Ontario and Quebec are both nice. You can get by in Quebec without French, but as mentioned it's useful if you're looking to get a job. And certain areas will be a little unfriendly if you can't speak french...

    Toronto is my personal favourite since there are so many activities, conferences etc. Also, from my experience Toronto is friendlier than other cities I've spent time in such as Edmonton, and Vancouver.

    I'm assuming that you prefer cities based on your post, but if you're interested in remote locations there are lots of great places in the Rocky Mountains, but avoid the prairies...

    Source(s): I live in the prairies and have gone on long visits to Montreal, Ottawa and Toronto many times.
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  • Anonymous
    9 years ago

    The 10 best places to retire in Canada include Victoria, British Columbia, Ottawa, Ontario, Kingston, Ontario, Vancouver, British Columbia, Québec, Québec, Lewis, Quebec, Halifax, Nova Scotia, Joliette, Québec, London, Ontario and Moncton, New Brunswick.

    Check out this site (see source) it might help you with info about Canada since it has a separate category about Retiring or relocating in Canada.

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  • 9 years ago

    You've missed out on one very important factor--where you can actually find a job. And right now, the prairie provinces (Alberta, Saskatchewan, Manitoba) have by far the lowest unemployment rates in the country.

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  • Anonymous
    9 years ago

    I've lived in Vancouver and have friends that are in Toronto.. Anyway, to cut it short, the best city to live in is Calgary for a number of good reasons: lots of jobs, lots of things to do, great community. The only down side is colder weather but hey it's Canada! Again depends what is your profession, but Calgary is generally better than any other Canadian city.

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  • 9 years ago

    You have the cart before the horse here. Before you try to choose a city...have you already gotten a visa...have you applied to immigrate? Immigration depends largely on your work skills and where you live will depend on where you find an employer. See sites below to do your research n immigration requirements.

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  • Anonymous
    9 years ago

    Southern New-Brunswick is better than any of those, I think. :O)

    In Quebec, some areas can be very unfriendly if you do not speak French. New-Brunswickers are almost as friendly as Newfoundlanders, really.

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  • 9 years ago

    Why do you even take into consideration things like demographics or weed? Seems like you're moving to Canada for the wrong reasons

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