Anonymous
Anonymous asked in Arts & HumanitiesGenealogy · 9 years ago

~What do these last names mean?~?

Ritchie and Graham

What do they originate from?

2 Answers

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  • Maxi
    Lv 7
    9 years ago
    Favorite Answer

    Recorded as MacRitchie, McRitchie, Riche, Richie, and Ritchie, this interesting surname is of early medieval English and Scottish origin. It is a diminutive of Richard, the popular Germanic personal name composed of the elements "ric", meaning power, and "hard", brave or strong. An 8th Century English kinglet of this name died at Lucca, in Italy, on his way to Rome, and is there still venerated as St. Ricardo, but it was as "Ricard" that the name was spread by amongst the Normans, and brought by them to England and Scotland after 1066. The surname as (Mac) Ritchie is mainly found in the Highlands, and more usually without "Mac" in Southern Scotland and the English border counties. Early examples include Duncan Richie, a kings messenger in Perth in 1505, John Riche who witnessed an instrument of sasine in Brechin in the same year, and Robert McRichie also known as Makryche, of Glenshee in 1571, whilst Duncan Riche was the king's sheriff of Inverness in 1512. William Ritchie founded the "Scotsman" newspaper in 1817, and Alexander Ritchie was an Edinburgh artist of repute in the early half of the last century. A Coat of Arms granted to this family depicts a shield divided in quarter: the first and fourth quarters depict three silver lions heads erased on a red chief, on a silver shield; the second and third are blue with a gold crescent between three silver cross crosslets. The first recorded spelling of the family name is shown to be that of Michael Rechy. This was dated 1350, in "Medieval Records of Inverness", Scotland, during the reign of King David 11 of Scotland, 1329 - 1371. Throughout the centuries, surnames in every country have continued to "develop" often leading to astonishing variants of the original spelling.

    Read more: http://www.surnamedb.com/Surname/Ritchie#ixzz18JJg...

    Although now widely associated with Scotland and Ireland, this distinguished surname is of Anglo-Saxon origins. It was a locational name originally from the town of Grantham in Lincolnshire, and as such recorded in the Domesday Book of 1086 as both Graham and Grandham. The translation is either the homestead (ham) on the gravel from the Olde English pre 7th century grand, meaning gravel, or perhaps the personal name "Granta" and hence Granta's homestead. Locational surnames usually developed when former inhabitants of a place moved to another area, and were best identified by the name of their birthplace. The surname Graham was taken to Scotland at the beginning of the 12th Century by the Norman baron William de Graham (see below), holder of the manor in Lincolnshire, from whom many if not all modern bearers are probably descended. James Graham, first marquis and fifth Earl of Montrose (1612 - 1650), fought on behalf of Charles 1st and became lieutenant- general to Charles 11 in 1648. This most notable surname has no less that forty-five entries in the "Dictionary of National Biography", and over forty coats of arms granted to families of the name. The first recorded spelling of the family name is shown to be that of William de Graham, which was dated 1127, in the Foundation Charter of Holyrood Abbey, Edinburgh, during the reign of King David 1st of Scotland, 1124 - 1153.

    Read more: http://www.surnamedb.com/Surname/Graham#ixzz18JJsm...

  • Nancy
    Lv 4
    4 years ago

    No surname is restricted to just one nationality or place of origin. It really does not matter that it is found in any country, or supposedly originates in one location. To help you understand.. my last name (when I was in school) was Siu, which came from my stepfather (whose father was born in China). I have no Chinese ancestry whatsoever. The only appropriate or reliable way of learning about your coworker is to ask her directly. The last name is not relevant.

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