how to look for a job?

Graduated with an Environmental Biology Degree. I have only worked two summers; one for the restoration project at Heart Miller Island in Baltimore and the with the DN R 's Crab Program this summer. These were contract jobs that last only 4 to 6 months. I have volunteered my service to the Chesapeake Bay Oyster Restoration program several times along with being a Blue Crab Sponser with the South River Federation. I donated my time with them also. I just recently came real close actually one of two in line for a job with the Alaskan Observers, Inc.

After what I thought was three real good interviews; I thought I had it in the bag, Apparently the other guys had a little more experience.

I must sent out 25 resumes a day. I hear about all the funding these projects are getting, well where's the money and why the hell can I get a dam job.

Its' a pretty sad when you spend five years in college, spend thousand of dollars just to find out you may be flipping hamburgers after all. What a waste of time.

If anyone out there knows anyone or has any suggestions, I am listening.

thanks,,

Michael a

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  • Marcia
    Lv 6
    10 years ago
    Favorite Answer

    Ok, so these are "trying economic times" and everyone is having troubles getting a job; including hamburger flippers. My bais is that many non-profit, research facility, and governemnt positions are going to be all the harder to get due to lack of funding. On the other hand, this is a bias not something I've actually looked into. My bias is that while there may be "many" new positions and funding sources out there, a number of the folks filling them are the same folks who have lost a different source of funding and possibly at the same organization that is now hiring them for the new position.

    So, the question remains - Who has the money to support someone with and Environmental Biology degree? My guess is well established organizations which may or may not be directly related to saving the planet but are working on habitat and species specific restoration, mainentance, and conservation. This could even mean sports fishing and hunting organizations. I certainly saw a lot of folks with titles, and possibly degrees, directing the clean up of the oil mess in the Gulf of Mexico. It would seem to me that there is still a lot of work opportunity within the Gulf whether or not there is funding. But, my question is, do these types of environmental disaster response folks keep a regular team of environmental biologist types on a payroll or, do they simply wait until a disaster occurrs? Right now, there is a lot emphasis on alternative energy development, green jobs, and etc.... The personnel types were crying the blues less than a year ago about not having enough folks with "green degrees" to satisfy the needs of industry. Certainly there are environmental impact issues with a number of the traditional and alternative energy solutions that would call for an environmental biologist; are they doing any hiring. There are small pockets of the country that are willing to make at least some sacrifices for at least the sake of their local environmental issues; are they doing any hiring. A number of the First Nations have active environmental programs; are they hiring? Lastly, have you checked into teaching?

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  • Anonymous
    10 years ago

    You may have to continue to do the seasonal gigs until you can get enough experience to get something full time and permanent. You can try and string some of them together to be employed for most of the year. You may have to work non-environmental jobs for a few months out of the year. Springtime is when you will find the MOST jobs available. Right now, things are pretty slow since many projects are based around breeding season which will not be for another 3-4 months. Be patient..it may take some time. I was in the same boat when I graduated with a zoology degree and took seasonal work for years before finally finding a great full time posititon as a wildlife biologist. Here are some sites to look for those seasonal as well as full time work:

    http://www.conbio.org/jobs/

    http://www.osnabirds.org/on/ornjobs.htm

    http://www.wfsc.tamu.edu/jobboard/

    Source(s): me: wildlife biologist/ornithologist
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  • 10 years ago

    Yeah it is sad when you invest so much into an education and still cant find a job. My advice would be to try expanding your network and getting to know as many people in the field you want to be in. Tons of people get the jobs they want because they just so happen to know the right people. Also, maybe where you live or are willing to travel to is just not the right area for the career field you are in. Some people end up having to relocate. Hope any of this helps but you probably knew all this already.

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  • J.
    Lv 6
    10 years ago

    Doing what you have been doing is probably your best bet. If people had the magic resume, the unemployment rate would not be where it is today.

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  • 10 years ago

    Write to ministry of environment.Admiral

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