Anonymous
Anonymous asked in Arts & HumanitiesGenealogy · 1 decade ago

What is the origin of the surname Nix?

4 Answers

Relevance
  • Tina
    Lv 7
    1 decade ago
    Favorite Answer

    Nix Surname

    This name is of early medieval English origin, and is a patronymic form of the surname derived from a short, pet form of the male personal name Nicholas. The ultimate origin of the given name is from the ancient Greek "Nikolaos", from "nikan", to conquer, and "laos", people; this was a very popular name among Christians throughout Europe during the Middle Ages, mainly through the fame of St. Nic(h)olas, a 4th Century Lycian bishop, about whom a large number of legends grew up, and who was venerated in the Orthodox Church as well as the Catholic. The given name is recorded in the Domesday Book of 1086 as "Nicolaus", while the short form appears in Yorkshire in 1316, when "John son of Nyk" is listed in the Court Rolls of the Manor of Wakefield. The modern surnames formed from patronymics of "Nick" include: Nix, Nicks, Nickes, Nixon, Nixson, Nickinson, Nickisson and Nickerson. The following entry appears in the Register of St. Peter's, Cornhill, London, in 1586: "Married - Benedict Nix, bacheler, and Elizabeth Cathron, a mayden". A Coat of Arms granted to a family of the name depicts a red chevron between three red leopards' faces on a gold shield. The first recorded spelling of the family name is shown to be that of Henry Nix, which was dated 1279, in the "Hundred Rolls of Oxfordshire", during the reign of King Edward 1, known as "The Hammer of the Scots", 1272 - 1307.

    http://www.surnamedb.com/Surname/nix#ixzz17Sez89dA

    Nix Name Meaning and History

    1. English, German, and Dutch: patronymic from a pet form of Nicholas (German Nikolaus).

    2. Irish (County Limerick): Anglicized form of Gaelic Mac Nioceais ‘son of Nicholas’, which was taken by some Limerick families named Woulfe.

    3. German (southern and Upper Rhine): from a nickname from Middle High German nickes(e), nixe ‘water sprite’.

    Dictionary of American Family Names, Oxford University Press, ISBN 0-19-508137-4

    http://www.ancestry.com/facts/nix-family-history.a...

    Nicholas Name Meaning and History

    English and Dutch: from the personal name (Greek Nikolaos, from nikan ‘to conquer’ + laos ‘people’). Forms with -ch- are due to hypercorrection (compare Anthony). The name in various vernacular forms was popular among Christians throughout Europe in the Middle Ages, largely as a result of the fame of a 4th-century Lycian bishop, about whom a large number of legends grew up, and who was venerated in the Orthodox Church as well as the Catholic. In English-speaking countries, this surname is also found as an Americanized form of various Greek surnames such as Papanikolaou ‘(son of) Nicholas the priest’ and patronymics such as Nikolopoulos.

    Dictionary of American Family Names, Oxford University Press, ISBN 0-19-508137-

    http://www.ancestry.com/facts/Nicholas-family-hist...

    Nix Surname

    The surname of NIX was a baptismal name 'the son of Nicholas' an ancient and still popular font name. The name was popular among Christians throughout Europe in the Middle Ages, largely as a result of the fame of a 4th century Lycian bishop, about whom a large number of legends grew up, and who was venerated in the Orthodox Church as well as the Catholic. East European forms of this name are spelt with the initial M, as Mikulas in Poland. The name was sometimes borne by women in the Middle Ages. Early records of the name mention Henry Nix of the County of Oxfordshire in 1273. Robert Nikkessine of the County of Nottinghamshire was documented in the year 1309. John Nickson of the County of Surrey was recorded in 1332. Margareta Nikeson of Yorkshire was listed in the Yorkshire Poll Tax of 1379. Susan, daughter of Thomas Nixon was buried at St. James's, Clerkenwell, London in 1635. The name is also spelt NIKESON, NICK, NICKSON and NICKERSON. http://www.4crests.com/nix-coat-of-arms.html

    When a surname has more than one possible origin, it is always best to research one’s ancestors to verify their origins so you can be certain of the origin of the surname.

  • Anonymous
    1 decade ago

    The surname 'Nix' is English, German, and Dutch - in all cases, a patronymic from a pet form of Nicholas (in German: 'Nikolaus'). The surname also could be Irish (from County Limerick), being an Anglicized form of the Gaelic name 'Mac Nioceais', meaning ‘son of Nicholas’, which was taken by some Limerick families named Woulfe.

    In Middle High German, the word nickes(e) (or nixe) meant 'water sprite'.

    Source(s): Ancestry.com surname database
  • Anonymous
    5 years ago

    For the best answers, search on this site https://shorturl.im/awNYI

    There are a few Turkish origin surnames in Greek society. One of them is as you said ; -oğlu which is divered to Greek as -oglou, the ones with -idis shows that they are Pontian. -λής suffix means -li -lı in Turkish which stands for inflectional suffix. Like, if someone is from Karaman you add Karaman + -li in Turkish, and when its divered to Greek it becomes Karamanlis like in Κωνσταντίνος Αλεξάνδρου Καραμανλής - Kostas Karamanlis. And as -λής, -τζή suffix was common in Greek society of asia minor which is also an inflectional suffix. Like in Ρίτα Αμπατζή - Rita Abatzi Abat+cı divered to Greek as Abatzi. Most of the Greeks changed their surnames but the ones who changed were generally from Aegean coastals or Istanbul. The ones from Karaman and Black Sea Region were / are proud of having asian minor background. And some might claim that they couldnt change their surnames but, Surname Law of Republic of Turkey was adopted on June 21, 1934, and Greeks moved to Greece in 1923 so they took their surnames after moving to Greece with their own choices. It was the sign of being an Anatolian Greek. As a summerize, they are proud of their surnames which shows off that they are from Mikrá Asia. @ Jason wowow ! you sound more racist. why cant you show respect to others. ( not just about this question ). EDIT: This question goes to another direction rather than surnames. Whats the point of discussing. Will governments confirm or deny when we start to eat each other. Gosh.. No need to be opressive on each other. End.

  • Anonymous
    5 years ago

    Some stated already - the name is part of ones identity and of course thousends of friendships broke with this war - they used to live somehow - more or less - peacefully together in Asia Minor. - off topic - If you are interested I would suggest this book to you: Matomena Chomata by Dido Sotiriou Sotiriou was born in Aidini, Asia Minor, in 1909 and was best known for her strong portrayal of women in books about Greeks fleeing Asia Minor and the Greek civil war. The novel that shot her to fame was “Matomena Chomata,” or “Goodbye, Anatolia,” which was published in 1962 and translated into six languages.

Still have questions? Get your answers by asking now.