Anthony asked in SportsCycling · 10 years ago

Indoor Bike Trainer Questions!?

What's the average life on one of these things? I'm looking at magnetic ones since I heard wind ones are awfully loud. Also, I have a Trek 3700 with mountain tires. I'll have to get training tires or road tires for the back, correct?

Best answer goes to the one with the most useful information.

9 Answers

Relevance
  • MtBikr
    Lv 7
    10 years ago
    Favorite Answer

    Average life,

    I had a mag trainer years ago and gave it away when I got my fluid2, my old mag. trainer is still used by who I sold it to, it's now going on 7 yrs old and still works fine.

    For casual use mag trainers work great, Yep wind trainer are very noisy.

    You might want to look at "fluid" type trainers depending on your budget.

    They tend to cost more than a mag. but offer more resistance and a more road like feel.

    Put the mtn tires away, they are real noisy on a trainer, any good road type tire will work.

    There are trainer specific tires in 26", but you don't want to use them for anything but on the trainer.

    They are designed for the heat trainers can put into a tire doing a hard workout.

    Bottom line, for a mag. trainer a road tire will do, if you get a fluid trainer and plan on putting out big wattage get a trainer tire.

    • Commenter avatarLogin to reply the answers
  • Ric
    Lv 5
    10 years ago

    Personally I'd stay away from amazon and buy at some place that deals with cycling like Performance Bicycle.

    The Travel Trac Fluid II Trainer is what I use, it's quieter than fan resistance and smoother than magnetic, the fluid resistance unit has long been known for its realistic simulation of on-the-road riding.

    Fluid resistance produces progressive resistance that increases as your wheel speed increases, so the faster you ride, the harder you have to work -- just like the road. It has an Aluminum drum and internal flywheel that facilitates a smooth, quiet pedaling action. Its gravity type frame stabilizes your bike and provides automatic pressure adjustment of the roller to the rear tire -- minimizing tire slippage and premature tire wear. It has a quick mounting system takes only seconds to secure or remove the bike and the frame folds compactly for storage or transport and it also accommodates most road and mountain bikes, it also comes with or Includes a rear quick release skewer to ensure proper bike fit, and I have never purchased a special tire for my TT-2 and I've used it with both road and mountain bike tires.

    Regardless of what type of trainer you purchase I would also suggest the Travel Trac Travel Block for the front tire, It will make riding any rear-mounted bike trainer more comfortable.The block keeps your bike level and your front wheel stable and fits both road and mountain bike tires.

    As far as life expectancy, there are a lot of variables to consider. Most people, myself included only use a trainer during winter months or when it's raining during summer months so the usage has a big part in how long a trainer will last. I can tell you I've used mine for a great number of years and have no issues what so ever.

    The link below offers Twenty different variations of trainers to choose from and right now the Travel Trac Fluid II Trainer is on sale, regularly $289.99 it's now $169.99.

    • Commenter avatarLogin to reply the answers
  • 10 years ago

    Trainers are very durable, if you buy one it will last a long time. If you have to buy a tire for your trainer, buy one designed for use on a trainer, it will last much longer than a generic smooth tread tire, and it will cause less wear to the drum on the trainer, a plus if you are worried about how long the trainer will last. I do training sessions at a shop that has very high end computerized trainers and they require that we use tires designed for that type of use because ordinary smooth tires cause excessive wear to the drum on the resistance unit. If you are going to train indoors use the equipment designed for that type of use, it doesn't cost any more and lasts longer.

    • Commenter avatarLogin to reply the answers
  • 10 years ago

    CycleOps is by far the best selling & probably the best - period. You are correct in assuming the wind trainers are noisy. You are also correct that mountain bike tires are very noisy. Kinda like driving next to a tractor-trailer with Mud & Snow drive tires.

    Don't forget the block to put under the front wheel so everything stays level. Or, you can stack them to get that uphill climb effect.

    • Commenter avatarLogin to reply the answers
  • How do you think about the answers? You can sign in to vote the answer.
  • Anonymous
    10 years ago

    Trainers last a long time the magnetic and fluid ones are the way to go. You want to put a smooth tire on the back to reduce noise and vibration. I have a Bell Motivator and use a Kenda Kross tire on the rear and have about 5,000 miles on both. My next one is going to be a Cycleops Fluid II. They also make special trainer tires.

    http://www.amazon.com/b/ref=amb_link_85930971_28?i...

    http://www.amazon.com/s/ref=nb_sb_noss?url=node%3D...

    • Commenter avatarLogin to reply the answers
  • Anonymous
    10 years ago

    Cycle Ops has a great trainer that has lasted me 4 yrs with little maintenance. You want a smooth rear tire too

    • Commenter avatarLogin to reply the answers
  • Anonymous
    10 years ago

    Go to Walmart and get the 12 function for $10 it's a very accurate and durable cyclocomputer

    • Commenter avatarLogin to reply the answers
  • Anonymous
    10 years ago

    Do you have hubs for disc brakes?

    • Commenter avatarLogin to reply the answers
  • Anonymous
    10 years ago

    I would rather have good V brakes then cheap disk brakes.

    • Commenter avatarLogin to reply the answers
Still have questions? Get your answers by asking now.