Does the word "Ya’aburnee" actually exist?

A post on matadornetwork.com about 20 untranslatable foreign words listed "Ya’aburnee" as an Arabic word that means "You bury me" with some pretty poetic connotations. However, my girlfriend mentioned that it sounded convenient, since the pronunciation of the word and the associated phrase were so similar.

So, I did a yahoo search. Ten pages of results later, I've yet to find one that is not the post itself, does not quote it directly, or does not reference it as the source of information.

Does this word exist, or did the writer make it up? Could someone please provide an alternative source to support this, preferably one that existed prior to Oct. 9th? (the day the post was made)

9 Answers

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  • 9 years ago
    Best Answer

    Yes, this phrase exists and is commonly spoken by Levantine Arabic speakers. It can be used flirtatiously or endearingly among love birds or loved ones. It usually comes as a sudden emotional outpouring acknowledging and celebrating the mere existence of the loved one or a quality that he/she possesses which is highly cherished by the speaker even after death/burial.

    It's basically an idiom that reads '[may] it bury me'. The pronoun 'it' can be a second person pronoun (he/she) or a possessive pronoun denoting a quality or a trait (her/his). Thus, the phrase is made a bit mysterious and less confrontational than 'ta'abrnee' = '[may] you bury me'

    To hover around the logic of this idiom, think of Cutting Crew's hit 'Love, I just died in your arms tonight' then replace 'die' with 'bury'

    Source(s): You're always welcome to quote me as a source that proves this idiom translatable.
  • Diane
    Lv 4
    4 years ago

    Yes it does exist. It's almost in full effect now. The UN was created for this purpose.The calls for a common currency or world currency will assure it's implementation. That's why the world is in the turmoil it's in. People need to wake up and listen to what the news tells us every day. The news doesn't use the term New World Order it simply tells us about the policies that will support the NWO.

  • 4 years ago

    For the best answers, search on this site https://shorturl.im/qHC0q

    hmmm.... I've had more than a handful of anarchist friends over the years and every time I tried to explain the whole "global banking cartel" thing to them they always argued with me that "nobody is controlling anything and all the problems in the world are driven by capitalist greed." Good to hear some of them are finally starting to do their homework... "New World Order" is just a phrase, it can mean many different things depending on the context and who is saying it. I prefer not to use this phrase at all because (1) despicable people like George H.W. Bush and Gordon Brown like to use it and (2) it carries with it a lot of stigmas and false associations that only hinder the discussion of geopolitics by filling people's minds with pre-programmed images of radical right wing militia types. Globalism, however, and the push for a unified world monetary system is quite real and has been out in the open for decades. Just for the sake of clarity.... no secret = no conspiracy Globalists are quite proud of their ambitions, and are usually eager to tell you all about them. The push towards a globalized and centralized "world economy" has been in the works for a LONG TIME and is just now finally beginning to come to fruition. In fact, the IMF is now calling for a new international reserve currency to which all national currencies will be pegged, with all exchange rates being controlled by unelected private bankers. So what do you call that? Gordon Brown calls it a "new world order." Also, "more communism" isn't really an accurate way to describe the systems of globalism. Words like 'Collectivism' and 'Neo-feudalism' are more accurate, in my opinion. Communism is a different, both on paper and in practice. "Collectivist" is a more general term which can be accurately applied to many political ideologies including globalism and communism. Good luck in your research.

  • 4 years ago

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    RE:

    Does the word "Ya’aburnee" actually exist?

    A post on matadornetwork.com about 20 untranslatable foreign words listed "Ya’aburnee" as an Arabic word that means "You bury me" with some pretty poetic connotations. However, my girlfriend mentioned that it sounded convenient, since the pronunciation of the word and the...

    Source(s): word quot ya aburnee quot exist: https://biturl.im/njey2
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  • Anonymous
    5 years ago

    I speak Arabic, and the phrase is real but not something you hear much in public discourse. There's no PDA--at least not as you'd think of it in the west--in Arab culture, so a phrase like this would be spoken in private. The differences you see in transliterated spelling are due to dialect differences and the gender of the person being addressed. In some dialects, the q is dropped, becoming a glottal stop (a'). So yaqburnee becomes ya'burnee, and that is the way I usually hear it, because the dialect I speak is Egyptian. If a male is being spoken of in third person, it's ya'burnee (he buries me). If a female is being spoken of in third person, it's ta'burnee (she buries me). If someone is being addressed in second person, it's also ta'burnee (you bury me).

  • 3 years ago

    Ya Aburnee

  • 9 years ago

    Yeah, it exist.

    The word literally it means "You bury me", but the intended meaning is "I wish that you don't die before, but I die before you and then you bury me".

    the word is used by people from the Sham region (Syria, Jordan, Lebanon, and Palestine), so it's pronounced by them as "Te 'eburnee" (تأبرني), but written as "Te-qburni" (تقبرني)

    Source(s): I'm a native Arab
  • brar
    Lv 4
    3 years ago

    You Bury Me

  • Anonymous
    9 years ago

    I don't know Arabic, much less regional dialects of it, but there is such an expression (may you bury me = I love you). Google Books finds these, which look in the right territory.

    * http://books.google.co.uk/books?id=zKLRnuXzIT8C&pg... (this one only has the Arabic, which I can't read).

    * http://books.google.co.uk/books?id=8CgoAQAAIAAJ&q=...

    * http://books.google.co.uk/books?id=t_khAQAAIAAJ&q=...

    * http://books.google.co.uk/books?id=w8l4AAAAMAAJ&q=...

    But I agree - "Ya’aburnee" seems to be floating around as a meme, always with the same backstory and always without verification. The books suggests it's more like "tuqburni".

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