Anonymous
Anonymous asked in TravelAsia PacificTaiwan · 9 years ago

Chinese fishing boat rammed into Japanese patrol boat!? Diaoyu island?

Chinese fishing boat rammed into Japanese patrol boat at Senkaku/Diaoyu islands on 7 Sept.

Yes!. China did it!

Japan was RIGHT!

中国渔船与日本巡逻船相撞录像外流 !

To Yonakuni 巡逻船“与那国”号

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=gOUvdNjs_Cg

Youtube thumbnail

To Mizuki 巡逻船 “水城”号

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=q3JYT0G94-E

Youtube thumbnail

8 Answers

Relevance
  • 9 years ago
    Favorite Answer

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=uZV8n4oCPJ8

    Youtube thumbnail

    The vids are real. I have this to say about them:

    The Chinese trawler has quite obviously turned into the the JCG ship in an attempt to ram it. You can see the crew heading inside for safety after getting a warning of their Chinese captain's intentions, and the captain makes his turn. You can see the prop wash of the trawler indicating the hard turn to port (into the JCG vessel). You can see the JCG go "full speed ahead" in an attempt to AVOID a collision.

    The Chinese were DEAD WRONG on this one.

    A FORMAL INTERNATIONAL APOLOGY FROM CHINA for the behavior of their citizens is REQUIRED!

    This is attack on another nation's military ship.

    MANDATORY APOLOGY, or else the PRC should be kicked out of the UN in light of the fact that the PRC had requested a formal apology from the Japanese for having arrested their thug AND imposed economic sanctions against Japan!

    @CI - There are NUMEROUS records showing that the Senkakus belong to Japan, and that this was agreed to by China. They were NOT signed away by Japan, as you falsely state, at the end of WW2. They were before, and still are, part of the Okinawa Prefecture. What are you going to claim next... that Honshu and Korea belong to the PRC as well? What a load of **** you are spitting out on this one.

    @Timothy Matthews- EVERY country in the world is "surrounded" by others. What makes China think it is so "special" that it is above the laws of International Boundaries? They'd better shape up, and stop trying to muscle their way onto other people's land.

    Source(s): WNL
    • Login to reply the answers
  • Anonymous
    9 years ago

    That's not a Chinese ship in the video its a pirate ship. I see no martime flags being flown off it. Pirates like these often use tactics as to crash into coastguards to escape. The Japanese did the right thing to arrest these pirates, yet this be a warning to all pirates not to mess in Japanese waters or suffer the same fate.

    • Login to reply the answers
  • 9 years ago

    The video link below shows the chinese trawler tackling to Japanese coast guard while Japanese officials were asking to stop in chinese near the island which is territorial water of Japan according to international law, and many country supports this such as America, etc

    The video was originally taken by Japanese coast guard and posted/leaked on youtube.

    But now chinese government praised the captain as their hero and now posted back that Japanese tackled chinese trawler. Chinese government are trying their best to delete all these videos so that chinese people won't see it while claiming Japanese ship tackled Chinese and even asking for compensation for the damage caused.

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=yOub-U8cY-8

    Youtube thumbnail

    &feature=mfu_in_order&list=UL

    (blue ship chinese)

    Well it is beyond obvious that chinese tackled according to 99% of Japanese people. it's not once, but twice!!!

    Japan released and sent back the captain as they did not want to lose their economic ties with the neighbor although he is criminal under Japanese law.

    Anyway background information

    The Senkaku Islands (Diaoyudao in Chinese name) have been known about since olden times both in Japan and China. The Senkaku Islands were integrated into Japan in January 1895, and are today part of Japan. No historical documents have been found which show, that in the period before their integration into Japan, they were in the possession of China or any other country. (see separate item)

    Japan's integration in 1895 of the Senkaku Islands was made by the cabinet decision at the time. In 1895, ten years before this, Tatsushiro Koga, a Japanese, applied to the Japanese government for lease of these uninhabited islands. In the over 70 years from the time Japan's possession of the Senkaku Islands began in 1895 to the early 1970s, there were no objection raised from abroad to the Senkaku Islands' belonging to Japan. Also at this time Japan continues to have effective rule over these islands.

    The 1895 integration of the Senkaku Islands by the Japanese government into Japan's territory was internationally the first act of territorial possession of these islands; which in international law is regarded as possession and effective rule based on occupation.

    China's claim to territorial rights waged from 1970s

    It was from the beginning of the 1970s that China and Taiwan began to claim territorial rights over the Senkaku Islands. As part of the background to this was a report on sea bed mineral research, published by ECAFE (United Nations Economic Commission for Asia and the Far East) in 1969, which pointed to the promising oil deposits existing around the Senkaku Islands.

    In China's documents, there is no record showing that the Chinese people have ever inhabited the Senkaku Islands. Neither the Ming nor the Qing (Ching) Dynasty declared internationally their possession of the Senkaku Islands. In maps covering the whole of China issued up to the 1960s by the People's Republic of China (for example, a map issued by the Peking Map Publisher, 1966), there was no mention about the Senkaku Islands, neither were they included in the Taiwan province maps. According to the Chinese maps, the geographical position of the Senkaku Islands (between 123.4 degrees to 125 degrees east longitude) are outside China's "territorial waters."

    It was in 1992 that China, in its Territorial Sea Law, added the Senkaku Islands to its territory.

    There is more evidence I can bring up if needed.

    • Login to reply the answers
  • Anonymous
    9 years ago

    The Diaoyu Islands belong to China, so the Japanese navy had no business being there. The "boat bumping incident" is irrelevant to the fact that China owns the Diaoyu Islands.

    Records proving Chinese ownership of the Diaoyu Islands date back to 1403. Japan temporarily and illegally controlled the islands through military aggression between 1895 and 1945. However, Japan relinquished all claim to the Diaoyu Islands as part of their surrender terms at the end of Warld War II. Ownership of the Diaoyu Islands is unquestionably in the hands of China.

    Japan's long history of aggression against China is instructive regarding their future plans. Japan wishes to challenge Chinese sovereignty and steal territory, just as Japan did during World War II. The problem for Japan is that China is no longer a backward and relatively powerless country, as it was 70 years ago. Modern China has the most powerful economy and military in Asia. Japan would be wise to rethink its goals and take a peaceful course instead.

    • Login to reply the answers
  • How do you think about the answers? You can sign in to vote the answer.
  • 9 years ago

    If the government of China continues to lie about all things they will never be thought of as a great power. No one will listen to much of what they say because they will always think the government is telling another lie. This government will have to make some big changes before they are ever thought of as credible.

    • Login to reply the answers
  • 9 years ago

    Look at a map of Asia.

    America and her allies in the East are slowly encircling China.

    • Login to reply the answers
  • 9 years ago

    yes of course they were, but Japan backed down like a little girl anyway

    • Login to reply the answers
  • 2 ray emitting cakes were not enough for the japs. it looks like they are longing for more.

    • Login to reply the answers
Still have questions? Get your answers by asking now.