Glock 45 ACP vs 9mm ammo, can you please answer some curiosities that I have between the two?

--How much of a difference is there in stopping power? I know the 45 is more powerful and a proven man stopper, but how much of a difference is there really between the two? I keep hearing "a world of difference" and "not too much of a gap between 9mm and 45 ACP rounds")

--What is the difference in ammo costs for target practice rounds?

--What is the difference between the recoils? (I also heard "a lot" and "not so much". I know the 45 is heavier)

--Is there much of a difference in accuracy and reliability between the two calibers? (Both compact pistols)

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  • 9 years ago
    Favorite Answer

    Okay, when I refer to the ".45" or "9mm" below, I mean .45 ACP or 9mm Luger. Also, I'm considering both rounds in MODERN conventional loadings with modern bullet design unless I specify otherwise. :)

    * Stopping Power

    In the numbers game, the .45 ACP is a bigger round with more energy so it would get the nod with regards to lab study. In real world use, the .45 ACP still has an advantage BUT one can debate the practicality of the advantage.

    With regards to immediate incappacitation, that usually means a shot to the heart or central nervous system (CNS) i.e. brain, spine, whatever. I would argue that a 9mm and .45 have similar success rates when fired directly into the brain, heart, or spine.

    Where a .45 has some advantages are when less than vital areas are hit (lungs, liver, extremities). These wounds aren't going to stop a person immediately even if they are lethal hits. What you're looking for on these is shock, quick loss of blood, or both. The .45 is, more than likely, going to make bigger wounds and has a better chance and making a wound going in and one going out (a very good thing). In a life saving situation, though, you may not care if the guy dies 15 minutes after the gunfight or not. What you want is them out of the fight IMMEDIATELY. So, that being said, while we all can agree the .45 has the better potential to kill, in a gun fight to save your life, I'm not sure how much weight that advantage carries. That being said, I carry a .45 sometimes, and that's all my wife carries.

    * Recoil

    If the round has more energy, it will have more recoil. That's physics. FELT recoil, on the other hand, is different. Much of that felt recoil depends gun design and loadings.

    I find lots of people who say a 9mm kicks "more" than a .45 aren't comparing apples to apples. If you dig a little deeper, you'll most likely find something like "my compact 9mm Glock loaded with Gold Dots kicks more than my Kimber full-sized 1911 firing mil-spec FMJ's". Well, yeah, THAT combonation will. That being said, if you take a small frame Taurus in 9mm and one in .45 ACP, and you put Gold Dots in the 9mm and a hefty (but non +P) loading in the .45, you'll probably note the .45 has more punch.

    Now, all that being said, I don't find the .45 ACP to be uncomfortable to fire even in practice quantities. I believe that, in felt recoil, there's just a bigger spread between the mil-spec .45 and a Cor-Bon or Black Hills "defense" loading in comparison to a mil-spec 9mm and a hotter defense load. The 9mm is almost always a bit "snappy" while the .45 can run from mild to "neh, I'll save the rest of the ammo for someone I don't like."

    * Accuracy and Reliability

    Most of this lies strictly with the gun. Neither round has a design advantage with regards to conventional combat accuracy, especially in a compact gun. If there WAS one, odds are none of us would be a good enough shot to exploit that difference, anyway.

    With regards to reliability, TECHNICALLY, the diameter to OAL of the 9mm makes it a more reliable feeder in automatics. The .45 ACP is a stubby round, and it doesn't lend itself as well as the 9mm to autoloading. This, of course, can be overcome in mechanical design, so it's no issue in a modern firearm. Crap, it's not an issue in OLD firearms (think 1911 and Hi-Power). For trivia's sake, the 10mm has the most favorable diameter to OAL ratio for autoloading.

    I dare say that a Glock in 9mm is no more or less reliable than a Glock in .45 ACP. You can insert Sig, HK, or whatever brands who have a similar family of designs between the two calibers.

    To sum up, the .45 ACP is, technically, a more effective round. In practicality, it's also a better round, but one must understand those advantages. The .45 ACP is not going to immediately kill someone in situations where a 9mm wouldn't (save for some barrier in between the gun and target). Having the guy die 20 minutes later on the scene or 4 hours later at the hospital may OR MAY NOT be a good thing. Who knows? It depends on what the guy did when he/she was wounded.

    ALL THAT BEING SAID, I carry .357 Sig, .45 ACP, and 10mm almost exclusively. The MAIN REASON I don't carry a 9mm is because . . . I don't own one. Also, with regards to practical carry, I see no advantage in one. I've yet to find a time when I couldn't carry a PT-145 or a G27 where I COULD HAVE carried a 9mm.

    I hope that helps!

  • 9 years ago

    1. They are both proven manstoppers (if the 9mm is loaded with quality JHP ammo). The fact the everyone is trying to convince you one way or another with theoretical physics examples shows that there is not really any real-world evidence that says one is significantly better than the other. The ability of the shooter has a bigger effect than the difference between these calibers. Also, in most situations, if I am pulling the trigger once, then I am pulling it twice without stopping to consider the damage of the first round. I have no qualms about using a 9mm for defense.

    2. At Walmart prices, 9mm is about $24 and .45 is about $35. If cheaper ammo means you will practice more, then that probably improves your chances when its important.

    3. I don't really perceive one as harder or heavier than the other. They are both very easy to get used to. The best I can describe the difference is the 9mm is like a "pop" and the .45 is like a "thump".

    4. No, there is no practical difference in accuracy between the calibers. A lot more depends on the gun, the cartridge, and the shooter.

  • 9 years ago

    We all have opinions.

    History says that the stopping power of the 45 acp is 3% more than the 9mm. Thats not enough for bragging rights.

    The US Army decommissioned the 1911 45 acp in favor of the Beretta 92 which is a 9mm.

  • WC
    Lv 7
    9 years ago

    .45ACP delivers the most energy to human targets, although it is much slower than the 9mm. The .45 derives its effectiveness on the size and weight of the bullet, whereas, the 9mm depends primarily on velocity for stoppong power. .45 ACP is over $20/50, whereas 9mm can be had for as cheap as $14/50.I find the .45 ACP to be a tack driver of a round.

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  • ?
    Lv 6
    9 years ago

    --How much of a difference is there in stopping power? I know the 45 is more powerful and a proven man stopper, but how much of a difference is there really between the two? I keep hearing "a world of difference" and "not too much of a gap between 9mm and 45 ACP rounds")

    OK, with a 115 grain bullet the best of the 9mm cartridges produce: 1,300 feet per second in velocity, and 420 foot-pounds of muzzle energy.

    Correspondingly, with a 230 bullet the best of the 45 ACP cartridges produce: 830 feet per second in velocity, and 352 foot-pounds of muzzle energy.

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/9x19mm_Parabellum

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/.45_ACP

    At face value it would appear that the 9mm bullet is the better, 'stopper'. However, the, 'delivery vehicle' (the bullet) also has to be considered. Ask yourself this question: What's going to hit you harder? What's going to change your mind about doing something quicker? A needle traveling at 500 miles per hour, or a baseball thrown at 250 miles an hour?

    Common sense tells you that - within reason - the baseball is going to hit a lot harder. The reason, 'Why' is referred to as the, 'cross-sectional density' (ratio of diameter to mass) of the missile. Within similar (useful) physical parameters: The greater an object's frontal striking area is, the harder that moving object is going to strike. (The old, 'broadsword vs. fencing foil' analogy comes to mind.)

    http://www.thehighroad.org/showthread.php?s=378068...

    As for which pistol chambering hits harder? Well, the historically correct answer is the 45 ACP.

    --What is the difference in ammo costs for target practice rounds?

    Around here, (Northeastern Pennsylvania) Wal-Mart sells their crappy range-quality 9mm ammo for about $12.00 to $14.00 per 50 round box. 45 ACP range-quality ammo sells for $16.00 to $20.00 per 50 rounds.

    --What is the difference between the recoils? (I also heard "a lot" and "not so much". I know the 45 is heavier)

    I own and shoot both pistols. (There's a 9mm sitting on my desk as I type.) The 9mm has the easiest-to-control recoil impulse. In the hands of an experienced pistol shooter, 9mm recoil feels like it's a hard fast snap. 45 ACP pistol recoil feels more like a slow heavy push. After lots and lots of practice I, personally, find 45 ACP to be just as easy (if not easier) to use as 9mm.

    In the middle of a match is when I have noticed this phenomenon the most - Whenever I've switched to a 9mm backup, the recoil seems like that of a, 'pop gun' to me. It's faster; it's snappier; but it's also a lot lighter, too. In favor of 45 ACP I'll add that the slower heavier push actually gives a shooter more time to regain control of the muzzle after the shot.

    This is, probably, the principal reason, 'Why' whenever I'm shooting quickly, I prefer to work with a 45 ACP. In fact I could stay with these two pistol chamberings for the rest of my life and not need anything else betwee 22 LR and 44 Magnum - That's it!

    --Is there much of a difference in accuracy and reliability between the two calibers? (Both compact pistols)

    No! 'Reliability' is more a function of each pistol's inherent design features rather than of the caliber, itself. As for accuracy? Either cartridge is going to be more inherently accurate than you are. (No offense) Again, it's the pistol's design that has more to do with accuracy than whatever bullet it's shooting.

  • 9 years ago

    A lot of words and few seem to address the questions...

    1) Stopping power of a .45 is greater than 9mm, but can vary. It all depends on the bullet weight, speed, and shape. High velocity hollow points of both calibers will stop most human targets with 1-3 rounds, but 9mm will always be prone to over-penetration due to higher velocity. (PS. Military adopted 9mm due to better light armor penetration and higher magazine capacity, period. The .45 is still being used by special forces for silenced weapons due to subsonic speeds).

    2) 9mm is almost always cheaper than .45. In bulk, savings could be as much as $0.15 per round, as compared to .45.

    3) Recoil feel is extremely subjective - a lot depends on the shooter and on the firearm used. In my experience with full frame semi-autos 9mm tends to kick the barrel up, while the .45 kicks the gun back a bit more, but has less of a barrel rise. However, in double and triple taps 9mm seemed to allow for faster target re-acquisition and slightly better accuracy. Again, this is from my experience and will vary for every individual.

    4) Compact pistols are intended for close-quarter, self-defense situations of 50ft or closer. At those ranges the accuracy both calibers are roughly identical and the real difference is made by the firearm itself and shooter's experience.

    Source(s): Firearms enthusiast of 10+ years, owned or tested well over 50 various firearms.
  • Erika
    Lv 4
    3 years ago

    45 Glock Price

  • 9 years ago

    "Glock 45 ACP vs 9mm ammo, can you please answer some curiosities that I have between the two?"

    "--How much of a difference is there in stopping power? I know the 45 is more powerful and a proven man stopper, but how much of a difference is there really between the two? I keep hearing "a world of difference" and "not too much of a gap between 9mm and 45 ACP rounds")"

    Answer: Although the .45ACP is considered to be a better man-stopper, the 9x19mm isn't far behind in the comparisons among pistol cartridges.

    Conventional wisdom says that where a person is hit by either one of the two cartridges is more important than which of the two cartridges hit the target. Both are considered effective for self-defense purposes.

    "--What is the difference in ammo costs for target practice rounds?"

    Answer: Although local prices vary, it has been my experience that .45ACP ammunition costs 20% to 40% more than 9x19mm ammunition.

    "--What is the difference between the recoils? (I also heard "a lot" and "not so much". I know the 45 is heavier)"

    Short Answer: Both .45ACP and 9x19mm generate 'managable' recoil.

    Long Answer: Perceived recoil forces vary according to the particular handgun design (how big & heavy it is) and the type of ammunition used. Ammunition that operates at higher pressures is likely to generate greater recoil forces. Heavier handguns do a better job of soaking up recoil forces. Compact handguns intended for concealed carry use are often smaller and lighter, and consequently pass along more of their recoil to the shooter.

    "--Is there much of a difference in accuracy and reliability between the two calibers? (Both compact pistols)"

    Answer: No.

    Ammunition manufactured by a company with a good reputation for quality (such as Federal, Remington, Winchester, Sellier & Bellot, Hornady and a few others) is very likely to function properly 100% of the time in a quality handgun. A brand-new handgun may need a break-in period of 200 to 400 fired cartridges, but after that it should perform well and only need a normal amount of cleaning, lubrication and maintenance.

    Each handgun is different, and may work better with its 'favorite' ammunition and might not work well with other ammunition.

    Figuring out what your gun likes involves some trial-and-error.

    If a handgun consistently fails to perform with all ammunition, it may need repair (or the shooter may need to be educated in proper shooting techniques?).

  • 9 years ago

    First, bullet placement is most important. The .45 ACP (automatic chambering Pistol) has a much greater stopping power,. On the other hand,not many animals or people that haven't been stopped by the .22 rim fire. Back to your question, you can go to this site and compare.

    http://www.handloads.com/misc/stoppingpower.asp?Ca...

  • 3 years ago

    1

    Source(s): Learn Personal Defence http://netint.info/UltimateSelfDefenseGuide/?OSgq
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