Rackkkss asked in PetsHorses · 9 years ago

horse trailer issues?

When travelling in a horse trailer my horse loses his footing and slips over on his knees or falls backwards. Its really hard to explain but he like falls over. He regularly cuts the top of his rump. I was considering buying a horsebox anyway but do you think he would travel well in one or do you have any tips to stop him slipping?

Update:

we were driving at like 20miles and hour and he is definatly slipping cause i traveled in the trailer with him. the trailer has like striped rubber mats on the floor?

7 Answers

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  • 9 years ago
    Favorite Answer

    We call that Wall Crawling. Years a go my sister had a Reg. A. mare that we had done a lot of showing and winning with and for no apparent reason she started to do it. She would put her one side against the side of the trailer and push to the center of the trailer with all 4 feed and would go down.

    We tried many things to fix he but could not. We had to stop showing her. If that is what your horse is doing good luck.

    This mare would load up with no problem and when the vibration of the truck when the motor was turned on she would go down.

    Please let us know if you find a way to stop it there may be other folks out there with the same problem.

    Source(s): I had a woman board with me whoes husband took two of their horses deer hunting. When they got back the horse that crawled had the sides of her hooves worn off flat from running on the edge of the trailer and rode most of the way down under the other horse.
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  • 9 years ago

    It sounds like he doesn't have any grip in there! What on earth is the flooring in the trailer? I've hardly ever heard of this happening before and especially not more than once. Like the last poster said, put some thick rubber matting down, check his shoes haven't been worn down too much and more importantly who's pulling the trailer? If the person driving is being careful with the horse in the back and giving him time to adjust his weight then there really should be no reason for him to slip over. Also, how much space does he have? If the partitions are set too far apart then he won't be able to balance himself properly. Taking a partition out or making it wider to 'give a horse more space' is one of the worst things you could do when travelling! Also it could just be that he's worrying himself while travelling and doesn't like it, but to be honest if he's tied up properly then he shouldn't have enough lee-way to end up on his rump? Just make sure he's booted up and if he's falling on his knees then make sure he has knee and hock boots on for travelling! Just make sure you sort out the floor of your box first. And alot of horses travel better in a horsebox so give it a go? Maybe see if you can hire one first.

    Whoops, looks like the last poster got to most of the points before me!

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  • .
    Lv 7
    9 years ago

    How fast is the driver going? Horses who habitually fall over usually are panicking because of a bad driving experience. Start from scratch, and only ship him for VERY short distances (as in, only down the driveway) and let him know he's safe.

    Yes, rubber mats are great, as are shavings on top to offer more grip. But also be aware of your horse's preferences for stall size. Some ship more comfortably in a 'double' stall so they can park out, spread legs and brace themselves that way. Others prefer a 'single' where it's more narrow and they can brace off the divider and wall to keep themselves up. Still others will only ship well in a box stall where they can move freely to find a position that is comfortable as they fatigue. Diagonal load trailers try to address this type of horse, but again, each is an individual.

    Yes, wrap his legs, or find shipping boots that come above his knees and hocks. Also don't tie him too tightly. Consider purchasing a wireless camera so you can keep an eye on what exactly he's doing during the transport. I can think of nothing beyond exceptional atheticism that would leave a horse with a wound on the top of his rump.. unless of course you're shipping a small pony in a trailer and he's getting stuck under the butt bar or chest bar or divider.. in which case it should be taken out.

    Hard to give further advice without knowing exactly what he's doing.. but you've got some suggestions here to get you started. Good luck.

    ................................

    Saw your add: Flip the mats over. The grooves on the mat are meant to be on the underside to allow urine to run off and let air circulate between the wood floor and rubber matt. He's slipping because the grooves are very hard to grip.

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  • 4 years ago

    First off not to say that you are wrong, just to correct you. A horse can see about 350degrees around them, that is only an itty bitty 10degrees they cant see directly behind them. So your horse was not having a problem because he couldn't see behind him. Horses are very basic creatures. Your guy does not have a loading problem. I think you do now. Your friends stole your confidence and made you do something you thought was wrong. Please Please do not just feed your horse in a trailer. This is dangerous and does not have the results you want. You need your horse to load when you ask, not just when he is hungry and feels like going in a trailer. Practice building you and your horses confidence. Put poles on the ground and walk your horse over them, walk him through gates, over bumps in the ground, etc. If your horse respects you and understand that when you ask him to do something he should do it, and he wont get hurt. Then he will do whatever you ask him to, whether it is going into a trailer, or leaving a burning building.

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  • Anonymous
    9 years ago

    RUBBER MATTING ON THE FLOOR AND GET A THICK STRAP AROUND HIS REAR TO HOLD HIM FIRM AND PUT SHIN PADS ON... is your trailer too bouncy are you driving too fast is the trailer tracking the pulling vehicle properly?

    Source(s): my late husband was a horseman and we had a v8 so we could pull float and the driving has to be very smooth and slowing down smooth etc.
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  • Anonymous
    9 years ago

    i have never heard of a horse slipping in a trailer you might what to check how fast you go what happens when you turn corners Remember you need to go slower when you have a horse in the back

    Source(s): been around horses my whole life
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  • Anonymous
    9 years ago

    Have you tried putting rubber matting on the ground to give him better grip?

    Id suggest doing this if the trailer doesnt have any

    xx

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