Don't take "Christ" out of "Christmas". Do you know your religion?

That time of year is fast approaching. If you are one of the many who go around saying, "Don't take Christ out of Christmas" in December, this is for you. http://www.crivoice.org/symbols/xmasorigin.html "In any case, by the fifteenth century Xmas emerged as a widely used symbol for... show more That time of year is fast approaching. If you are one of the many who go around saying, "Don't take Christ out of Christmas" in December, this is for you.

http://www.crivoice.org/symbols/xmasorigin.html

"In any case, by the fifteenth century Xmas emerged as a widely used symbol for Christmas. In 1436 Johannes Gutenberg invented the printing press with moveable type. In the early days of printing typesetting was done by hand and was very tedious and expensive. As a result, abbreviations were common. In religious publications, the church began to use the abbreviation C for the word "Christ" to cut down on the cost of the books and pamphlets. From there, the abbreviation moved into general use in newspapers and other publications, and "Xmas" became an accepted way of printing "Christmas" (along with the abbreviations Xian and Xianity). Even Webster’s dictionary acknowledges that the abbreviation Xmas was in common use by the middle of the sixteenth century.

So there is no grand scheme to dilute Christianity by promoting the use of Xmas instead of Christmas. It is not a modern invention to try to convert Christmas into a secular day, nor is it a device to promote the commercialism of the holiday season. Its origin is thoroughly rooted in the heritage of the Church. It is simply another way to say Christmas, drawing on a long history of symbolic abbreviations used in the church. In fact, as with other abbreviations used in common speech or writing (such as Mr. or etc.), the abbreviation "Xmas" should be pronounced "Christmas" just as if the word were written out in full, rather than saying "exmas." Understanding this use of Christian symbolism might help us modern day Xians focus on more important issues of the Faith during Advent, and bring a little more Peace to the Xmas Season."

The link provided points to a religious site so it's not a bunch of atheists trying to brainwash you or lead you astray.

My question here is: If in the past you looked down on people using "Xmas" instead of "Christmas", after reading about the actual origin of the abbreviation, would you then happily pass the information on to your christian friends and family and/or educate people at your church were they to voice their disapproval at seeing "Xmas" this year?

It can help both "sides" to do so. Firstly, less people would be getting needlessly frustrated and spreading around negativity and would know a little more about the symbolism of their own religion. Secondly, less non-religious people who prefer using "Xmas" would have indignant christians criticising them when (if it's a sign saying "Happy Xmas") their intention was to spread some cheer.

I love seeing decorations up everywhere and having strangers wish you well. Is it possible for us to focus less on the negative this year and just be happy for others to celebrate in their own way, be that religious, secular, or none at all?
Update: To those saying it was originally a pagan holiday - this isn't being called into question at all. The question was aimed at those who take offence to the abbreviation "Xmas"
Update 2: @Camille..."Retailers started the Xmas abbrevition"
Please read the two paragraphs pasted below the link. This is for you and not an attack of any sort on your religion.
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