Anonymous
Anonymous asked in Arts & HumanitiesHistory · 1 decade ago

Was Russia once owned by the Soviet Union?

A debate popped up with my friends. One says that Russia was once owned by the Soviet. The other said no. Who's right?

Update:

SO going back in history, who owned all of russia?

Update 2:

Including Estonia, Ukraine, etc. Wasn't it all just one big colony?

6 Answers

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  • Anonymous
    1 decade ago
    Favorite Answer

    Russia wasn't "owned" by the USSR, but rather the USSR was a continuation of Russia. In the years preceding the 1917 Russian Revolution the people became angrier and angrier with the Tsar's policies and with the fact that he was married to a German princess (at that time Russia was involved in the First World War against Germany). Then, with the 1917 revolution the Russian Empire was dissolved and transformed into the Russian Soviet Federative Socialist Republic (RSFSR). Before the revolution though, the Tsar was the supreme ruler of Russia and all of its territories (official title: By The Grace of God, Emperor and Autocrat of All The Russias, and went on listing all of the controlled territories), which included modern-day countries like Ukraine, Estonia, Poland, Kazakhstan, etc. After Russia revolutionized and created the RSFSR, many previously controlled territories also formed Soviet governments, and formed the Union of Soviet Socialist Republics. After the revolution Russia constituted most of the USSR, so, as a final answer to your question: the USSR didn't own Russia, but rather Russia was a part of it, with it having a different government from the previous one, and with more countries in it.

  • 1 decade ago

    In a way Russia WAS owned by the USSR. The ethnic composition of the party (the Bolsheviks) which seized the power in Petrograd (then the capital of the Russian Empire) in 1917 was extremely diverse. There were Jews, Russians, Lithuanians, Polish, Czechs, Georgians, Armenians etc. They were brought together by their hate for the Russian Empire, Russian culture and their belief that national belonging was not important at all. The result of their struggle for political superiority led to the situation when the entire social layer of the educated ethnic Russians was wiped out (either killed or pushed out of the country). Millions of Russians perished in the Russian Civil war or immigrated abroad. So, later that beheaded territory was turned by the Bolsheviks into the RSFSR (Russian Soviet Republic) and then with other Soviet republics (Ukraine, Belorussia, Transcaucasia etc.) was turned into the USSR in 1922. Technically the USSR was a number of republics (now independent countries) under political leadership of the Communist party. To say that Russia was a "leading" republic among those "entities" means to repeat the mantras of the Soviet propaganda encouraged by Stalin (ethnic Georgian) and his"multicultural" leadership of the USSR. Russia was a miserable victim of the situation.

  • 1 decade ago

    It would be more accurate to say that the Soviet Union (officially the Union of Soviet Socialist Republics or USSR) was owned by Russia. Russia was by far the largest and most powerful of the "Socialist Republics" in that union. Moscow, today's capital of Russia, was the capital of the entire Soviet Union. Russia thoroughly dominated the other members of the USSR, so much so that it was common for people to say "Russia" when they meant "Soviet Union."

  • Anonymous
    1 decade ago

    Russia was the central state in the Union of Soviet Socialist Republics. It dominated all the other states (or theoretically independent Republics).

    I suppose that before the Russian Revolution you might say that the Czar "owned" Russia.

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  • Greg
    Lv 7
    1 decade ago

    Russia made up the majority of the USSR.

  • 1 decade ago

    Russia was not owned by the USSR

    Russia was revolutionized into the USSR after the economy collapsed i believe in 1921

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