How to make tent more comfortable?

How to I make my tent more comfortable?

9 Answers

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  • chris
    Lv 7
    9 years ago
    Best Answer

    The keys to tent comfort are to make them as much like home as possible. Assuming your car camping and can bring it all here are some suggestions;

    Get the right size tent, suitable for the weather. For a family tent size does matter, the bigger is better but huge is not. What I mean by that is space is important to reach the optimum comfort levels. Which is big enough for all your gear, and to stand up in, change clothes etc. To big and it becomes impossible to heat up and hold down in a big rain squall. Suitable for the weather means a tent that breathes well in the summer, keeps rain out and heat in, in the winter. Not all tents will suit the need for all weather conditions but ones that are rated for three seasons come pretty close.

    Get the right gear suitable for the season. Sleeping bags are rated in temperature scale the lower the temperature the warmer the bag. Now getting one bag for all seasons is ok just get the coldest bag to start with. You can always zip it up or down according to your needs but you can't make a summer temp bag warmer. Kots are very comfy in the summer adding a foam mattress makes them even more comfy. Air mattresses are great for summer use but in the winter they have zero insulation value. A good go between are chaise lounge pads these are filled with foam or the same stuff that sleeping bags are they insulate well and never deflate. Add some extra blankets and your good to go.

    Furniture in tents gives you the taj majual look I already mentioned kots to which you can store gear under so throw in a table and some chairs and you have a spot to play games when it rains, a place to put the lanterns and a spot to sit and tie your shoes. Lanterns of course need to be electric/battery operated there is no way that you need to risk burning the tent down with a knocked over gas or candle lantern. The bigger the better, they are rated in lumens get at least a 100+ model. two of them would be better than one, in case someones gotta go in the night the other is still in the tent.

    Deal with the heat properly. In summer a good tents ventilation will keep things somewhat cool adding an electric fan will move the air around which is specially needed after a good meal of beans. In the winter, and here is where a lot of folks make bad decisions, adding a space heater or a tent stove will warm things up a lot. The Bad thing here is that all gas fuel powered heaters put out Carbon Monoxide gas which can kill you so unless your tent is specifically designed for there use you can only use an electric model and then you need a power supply and who wants to listen to a generator all night. Some campgrounds now have electricity plumbed to all there sites so look into those if your winter camping.

    Flooring is sweet. A cold floor is something that send chills up my spine just thinking about. Start by setting your tent over a tarp to protect your tents built in floor, this also adds a bit of insulation as it locks out the ground moisture coming into the tent. Inside role out the carpet wall to wall this again protects the tents built in floor from the kot, chair and table feet and gives it that total home like feeling. Put a artificial turf grass door mat in the front door and move in your now Home Away From Home.

    Source(s): For more winter camping info look here, http://www.princeton.edu/~oa/winter/wintcamp.shtml
  • 3 years ago

    We are providing Tent in entire US at affordable prices and also providing Accessories ,easy pop up Tents,flea market Tent. also check that you're not setting-up in a place where water will run through or collect during a storm (especially avoid dry creek/river beds). In hot weather you want a shade and a good breeze. In the winter you want a location that is protected from the wind but not at the bottom of a gully or canyon where cold air will collect. Also pay attention to where the sun will rise and set, and which direction the prevailing wind blows, and the presence of any game trails or heavy signs of predators.

  • Mark M
    Lv 6
    9 years ago

    Don't use one. Unless there's some disqualifying factor (weather, temperature, insects, snakes), sleeping out in the open on a sleeping bag and mat is the most comfortable way to go.

    Either way, make sure you choose your site carefully. Obviously, you want a flat area free from rocks. But also check that you're not setting-up in a place where water will run through or collect during a storm (especially avoid dry creek/river beds). In hot weather you want a shade and a good breeze. In the winter you want a location that is protected from the wind but not at the bottom of a gully or canyon where cold air will collect. Also pay attention to where the sun will rise and set, and which direction the prevailing wind blows, and the presence of any game trails or heavy signs of predators.

    Then prepare your site by getting on your hands and knees to get rid of all sticks, rocks and stones. At the same time you'll discover if there's any animal or insect nests that might cause you reason to relocate. Decide how you want to orient your tent relative to the sun and wind. Then find dead, dry leaves, pine needles, grass, ferns, etc., and make a pile about a foot deep and the size of your tent. Spread your ground sheet over the leaves and then setup your tent on top. Make sure your ground sheet doesn't stick out further than the floor of your tent.

    If you're using a camp cot instead of (or in addition to) a sleeping pad, use furniture coasters (plastic circles or squares used under furniture legs to protect the floor) to keep the cot's legs from sinking into the soil, possibly puncturing your tent floor. I've seen people spread out old comforters under their tent for padding/insulation (instead of leaves), but I can think of better things to carry for that space and weight, even in a car. I use sleeping pads: either a Thermarest Neoair when backpacking or an REI Camp Bed 3.5 when car camping: both are comfortable and provide some insulation from the cold ground. On top of that goes my Campmor 20*F rectangular down sleeping bag, which I'll sleep on top of if it's warm enough, or crawl inside and zip up. I also bring a silk sleeping bag liner that I can use alone in warm weather or with the bag in very cold weather. For a pillow I just stick the dry bag with my spare clothes inside a pillow case.

    My opinion is that tents are for sleeping and changing clothes. If I'm car camping I bring a small door mat for outside the tent entrance and an LED/battery lantern for inside. But all activities other than sleeping or changing clothes happen elsewhere. So I wouldn't setup a table or chairs inside my tent -- too much temptation for bringing food or drink inside. When backpacking I'll string my poncho if needed to make a dining/sitting area protected from the rain. If car camping I'll have a good size tarp or easy-up canopy, possibly even a screen room for my dining and sitting area.

  • 4 years ago

    Cormfortable solar tent in himin :www.himin.com

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  • Anonymous
    9 years ago

    Throw down a big bean bag and a small tent table and you're good to go. Those floor based video rocker chairs work good too.

  • Bobo
    Lv 7
    9 years ago

    Make sure it is big enough. Provide lighting. A small throw rug by the door to help keep the dirt out. Cots with foam sleeping pads and good sleeping bags.

  • 3 years ago

    1

    Source(s): Battery Reconditioning Guide http://teres.info/BatteryReconditioningCourse/?2UX...
  • Anonymous
    9 years ago

    Set it up on top of your bed

  • 9 years ago

    make a fort inside with all your little children friends and then yell at them

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