Do you know the Christian connection to Halloween?

What are Christians to think about the devil, exorcism, psychic hotlines, fortune tellers, ESP, ghosts and magic, and that Halloween really is “of the devil and the demons” as Most Christians claim?

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  • IJAH
    Lv 6
    9 years ago
    Favorite Answer

    well, dressing up like animals, or demons to scare people is CHRISTIAN doncha know{ please detect sarcasm here} For after all, Jesus would take part, what would Jesus do?, if i went trick or treating dressed as the devil? and he just happens to appear at that very moment. I would have trouble recognizing him for sure because he is way scarier than the devil! He has flames in his eyes{ for those of you that take every word seriously and literally see Ezekiel chapter 1. while I suppose getting candy is cool enough with him, but really, why would it be wrong to dress like a ghost, or a fortune teller, or king tut, or even Jesus ? or an angel?? why , why , why???? .......................Seek to Know Jehovah

    A positive influence that held sway during the early years of Josiah’s life was that of his repentant grandfather, Manasseh. How much contact the two had, and how old Josiah was when Manasseh corrected his ways, the Bible does not say. Since Jewish families were close, Manasseh may have tried to save his grandson from the corrupting influences around him by instilling in his grandson’s heart some respect for the true God, Jehovah, and his word. Any seeds of truth that Manasseh was able to plant in Josiah’s heart, perhaps combined with other positive influences, eventually bore fruit. In his eighth year on the throne of Judah, 15-year-old Josiah sought to know and do Jehovah’s will.—2 Chronicles 34:1-3.

    The only spiritual contact some people had in their childhood was a distant relative, an acquaintance, or a neighbor. Yet, if nurtured, the seeds thus planted can bear good fruits later. Malinda, mentioned earlier, had a grandfatherly neighbor who regularly brought the Watchtower and Awake! magazines to her house. Remembering him with fondness, she says: “What impressed me the most about my neighbor was that he did not celebrate holidays. This was important to me because Halloween and some of the other holidays were occasions for ritualistic practices in my parents’ cult.” A decade later, when a friend invited Malinda to attend a Christian meeting at the Kingdom Hall of Jehovah’s Witnesses, she remembered this neighbor and readily accepted the invitation. That helped her to search for the truth............................OCTOBER

    22 - 29 Sacrifice preparation: kidnapping, holding and ceremonial preparation of person for human sacrifice.

    28 - 30 Satanist high unholy days: Related to halloween. Human sacrifices.

    31 All hallow's Eve (Halloween): One of the two most important nights of the year. Attempts are made to break the bond which is keeping the doors to the underworld closed. Blood and sexual rituals. Sexual association with demons. Animal and human sacrifice - male or female.

    Source(s): The Watchtower 4/15 2001, also the true calendar for satanists practiced on this night every year! And IT IS REAL< don't fool your self by denying that unexplained murders of the homeless are not right up their alley! Must be why homelessness is not an issue that anyone wants to solve , in any government!
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  • 4 years ago

    There is no protestant connection. But there is a strong Catholic connection. Back in Spain, I believe, priests would ring the church to remind the congregation to pray for the souls of the dead. In England beggars would go door to door for soul cake in exchange for prayers for the dead. And then there's the danse macabre. Usually at a Catholic church a dance will be performed where the dancers are made to look like the dead to remind the congregation once again to pray for their souls.

    Even though there are indeed pagan Celtic influences, the Catholic church reworked the holiday making All Hallow's Eve closer to the modern

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  • Anonymous
    9 years ago

    Once upon a time, pagans celebrated Samhain (sow-en) which is "All Hallow's Eve." The next day is for saints & the 3rd for all souls. It's a time when the veil between the living & dead is lifted briefly, the end of Harvest & the Witches (from Wicca, meaning wise) new year. The Christians made it of the devil (since witches generally don't believe in Satan) & first made it scary & now serve up candy & fun just to make us all forget that to some, it's an important "holy" day. The demons are in politics. Oct. 31 is the beginning of a 3 day celebration & HAD to be disguised to appease the christian agenda.

    Source(s): witchiness
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  • Jerry
    Lv 5
    9 years ago

    Hallows' Eve where Halloween came from is the eve or vigil of All Hallows which is All Saints' Day. On All Souls Day, the day after All Saints, the poor begged for food and promised to pray for the dead in return. The little cakes that were given out were called soul cakes not the biggest stretch from today's trick or treat spoils. Candy has replaced the donut type cake representing eternity. There are still some places where the people visit cemeteries on All Hallows, not foe spooky reasons, but for the same reason others do on Memorial Day except they have picnics.

    Source(s): Catholic Source book
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  • 9 years ago

    There is NO "Christian connection to Halloween."

    Those who think it is OK to celebrate or participate - even in some "innocent" manner are obviously not familiar with the background of this holiday.

    The term "background check" has become a phrase that is used to check the reputation of an individual or a business. We decide whether to hire people or do business with companies based on the results of these "checks".

    Holidays should also have "background checks." It may be surprising where they came from and the significance they had from their inception.

    And we may find it best to avoid them due to what we find out about them.

    Source(s): One of Jehovah's Witnesses
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  • garnan
    Lv 6
    9 years ago

    The Encyclopedia Americana says: “Elements of the customs connected with Halloween can be traced to a Druid ceremony in pre-Christian times. The Celts had festivals for two major gods—a sun god and a god of the dead (called Samhain), whose festival was held on November 1, the beginning of the Celtic New Year. The festival of the dead was gradually incorporated into Christian ritual.”—(1977), Vol. 13, p. 725.

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  • 9 years ago

    Halloween should repulse all true Christians. It is the biggest holiday of the year for those who are into spiritism.

    Without even looking it up in an encyclopedia, why would a Christian want to dress up as a Evil Spirit, ghost, devil, murderer, etc?

    Source(s): One of Jehovah's Witnesses
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  • 9 years ago

    Christian connection???? None whatsoever to my knowledge, but most of Christendom will argue the point that it [halloween] as well as the other pagan holidays have a "christian connection" ~sigh~

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  • 9 years ago

    Halloween: Though celebrated as a Christian holiday, Halloween finds its origins in pre-Christian festivals that propagate false ideas about life after death. Interestingly, we read: “After the Reformation, Protestants rejected this feast along with other important ones such as Christmas and Easter. Nevertheless, Halloween folk customs of pagan origin flourished.”—Encyclopædia Britannica (1959), Volume 11, page 107.

    All Saints’ Day: “There is little doubt that the Christian church sought to eliminate or supplant the Druid festival of the dead by introducing the alternative observance of All Saints’ day on Nov. 1. This feast was established to honour all saints, known or unknown, but it failed to displace the pagan celebration of Samhain.”—Encyclopædia Britannica (1959), Volume 11, page 107.

    The Odd Couple—Halloween and All Saints’ Day

    HALLOWEEN got its name from the old English term All Hallows E’en, the eve of all the holy ones’ day, or All Saints’ Day, which falls on November 1 in the Church calendar. But just how did a night full of ghosts, witches, skeletons and a host of other things of the dark ever get tied up with a day for the “saints” of the Roman Catholic Church? It is a story that betrays how thin is the line separating pagan folklore and Church practices.

    Where Halloween Got Started

    Under the heading “Halloween,” the “Encyclopædia Britannica” says: “Oct. 31 was also the eve of the new year in both Celtic and Anglo-Saxon times and one of the ancient fire festivals. . . . Since November ushers in the darkest and most barren half of the year, the autumnal festival acquired sinister significance, with ghosts, witches, hobgoblins, fairies and demons of all kinds roaming abroad.”

    The festival was held in honor of Samhain, the Celtic lord of the dead, who it was believed, allowed the souls of those who died in the preceding year to return home that evening. Festivities included building huge bonfires to chase away the witches and demons. Sacrifices of crops, animals and even humans were made to appease the souls of the deceased. The people also engaged in fortune-telling and wore costumes made of animal heads and skins.

    The Romans also contributed some of their pagan rituals to the customs of the Celts whom they conquered. One of their autumn festivals held in honor of Pomona, the goddess of trees and fruits, probably accounted for the prominent use of apples in Halloween festivities—apple-bobbing and apple-on-a-string, for example.

    What About All Saints’ Day?

    For centuries, the Romans prayed for their dead at the Pantheon, the temple dedicated to the goddess Cybele and other Roman deities. Then in about 610 C.E., Emperor Phocas presented the temple as a gift to Pope Boniface IV, who rededicated it to Mary and the martyrs of the Church on May 13, the date of a feast observed by the Church for its martyrs. Thereafter, Roman converts could come to the same temple to pray for their dead, only now in the name of Mary and the martyrs instead of Cybele and the deities. For some 200 years the anniversary of the dedication became the major celebration at the “Christianized” Pantheon, and this observance, many authorities believe, became the predecessor of All Saints’ Day.

    How the Two Got Together

    The needed linkage was the Roman conquest of the Celts, who subsequently became “Christians.” However, they persisted in many of their customs, including their October 31 festival of the dead. So, in 837 C.E., Pope Gregory IV, in line with the Church policy of absorbing and “Christianizing” the customs of the converts rather than abolishing them, ordered that November 1 be observed throughout the Church as a day for all the “saints.” Thus, in a single stroke of ecclesiastical diplomacy, a totally pagan festival with all its paraphernalia intact was married to the Church’s own centuries-old pagan worship of the dead. And ever since, the odd couple, Halloween and All Saints’ Day, have inseparably stuck together.

    Source(s): *** g81 10/22 p. 16 The Odd Couple—Halloween and All Saints’ Day ***
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  • 9 years ago

    The thought of Halloween being "The Devils Day" is stupid. I myself am a Christian and the hole thing about Halloween being evil is unrealistic. I think of it as just a fun holiday that gives an excuse to scare people.

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