In what conditions and how MUSHROOMS produces Vitamin D via sunlight?

When its cultivated, raw, dried???

Update:

BUT WHAT KIND OF MUSHROOM HAVE TO BE EXPOSED? I mean, if i take raw mushrooms for the supermarket, the sunlight works?

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  • Anonymous
    9 years ago
    Favorite Answer

    Mushrooms makes Vitamin D when exposed to SUNLIGHT.

    How Mushrooms produces Vitamin D:

    “Mushrooms contain A PLANT STEROL CALLED EROGOSTEROL THAT GETS CONVERTED INTO VITAMIN D WHEN EXPOSED TO SUNLIGHT.....

    MUSHROOM VARIETIES rich in Vitamin D:

    BUTTON

    CRIMINI

    PORTBELLA

    WILD MUSHROOMS ARE BEST AND RICH TO MAKE VITAMIN D.

    DOLE AND MONTEREY MUSHROOMS.....

    The top three selling mushroom varieties ( BUTTON ,CRIMINI AND PORTBELLA) have vitamin D ranging from 1 to 97 % of the Daily Value (400 IU) per raw 84 gram serving4.

    DETAILED:

    Tara McHugh, Ph.D., research leader at the Western Regional Research Center of the Agricultural Research Service. This conversion is similar to the one that creates vitamin D in our skin. Mushrooms grow in the dark, so theoretically you could force them to make vitamin D by exposing them to sunlight, but it would take a long time. Instead a new technique exposes mushrooms to high-intensity artificial UV rays for a few minutes (think tanning bed).

    McHugh helped to develop the process for Monterey Mushrooms, which launched its Sun Bella brand this fall. Dole Food Company, Inc. employs a similar method to create its vitamin-D-rich portobello mushrooms, which have been on the market since June. A single 3-ounce serving of Sun Bella or Dole mushrooms has 100 percent of the recommended daily intake for vitamin D.

    Farmed mushrooms are low in that.

    Most people are aware that the human body makes vitamin D in response to sunlight. Less known is the fact that mushrooms, even picked ones, can perform the same feat - which means that eating mushrooms that have been exposed to sunlight can be an excellent way to supplement your "D" levels.

    In the summer of 2004, mycologist Paul Stamets discovered that the level of vitamin D in freshly picked, indoor- grown shiitake mushrooms rose from 110 IU (international units) to an astonishing 46,000 IU per 100 grams when the mushrooms were placed outdoors in the sun for just six hours with the gills facing up (when the gills were facing down, the level rose to 10,900 IU).

    This means that eating just one gram of sun-treated shiitake - about one tenth of one mushroom - would give you 460 IU, close to the FDA's recommended daily dose of 400 IU, and about half of Dr. Weil's recommended 1,000 IU.

    In his book, Mycelium Running: How Mushrooms Can Help Save the World, Stamets concluded, "(In) populations where vitamin D is seriously deficient, sun-exposed dried mushrooms can help address a serious health issuE

    U CAN GET THEM AT HERE:

    (http://dolemushrooms.com/Vitamin%20D.htm)

    (http://www.pr-inside.com/monterey-mushrooms-inc-la...

  • 9 years ago

    I think all they need is to be exposed to UVB. Those are the higher energy photons so it probably requires a strong sunlight to get a good quantity. I read an article about vitamin D the other day and they mentioned that eukaryotic muchrooms produce vitamin D. I am pretty sure they mentioned that it is usually produced by yeast commercially by just exposing it UVB.

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