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Why does the white flag mean surrender?

I've seen it in cartoons, documentaries, books and other places. But why does it mean surrender? How did it originate?

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  • 10 years ago
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    The white flag is an internationally recognized protective sign of truce or ceasefire, and request for negotiation. It is also used to symbolize surrender, since it is often the weaker military party which requests negotiation. A white flag signifies to all that an approaching negotiator is unarmed, with an intent to surrender or a desire to communicate. Persons carrying or waving a white flag are not to be fired upon, nor are they allowed to open fire. The use of the flag to surrender is included in the Geneva Conventions.

    The improper use of a white flag is forbidden by the rules of war and constitutes a war crime of perfidy. There have been numerous reported cases of such behaviour in conflicts, such as fighters using white flags as a ruse to approach and attack enemies, or killings of fighters attempting to surrender by carrying white flags. Many times since the weaker party is in a decrepit state, a white flag would be fashioned out of anything readily available, like a t-shirt or handkerchief. The most common way of making a white flag is to obtain a pole and tie two corners of a sheet of cloth to the top of the pole and somewhere in the middle.

    Origin

    The first mention of the usage of white flags to surrender is made during the Eastern Han dynasty (A.D 25–220). In the Roman Empire, the historian Cornelius Tacitus mentions a white flag of surrender in A.D. 109. Before that time, Roman armies would surrender by holding their shields above their heads. The white flag was widely used in the Middle Ages in Western Europe to indicate an intent to surrender. The color white was used generally to indicate a person was exempt from combat; heralds bore white wands, prisoners or hostages captured in battle would attach a piece of white paper to their hat or helmet, and garrisons that had surrendered and been promised safe passage to safety would carry white batons. In 1625, Hugo Grotius in De jure belli ac pacis (On the Law of War and Peace), one of the foundational texts in international law, recognized the white flag as a "sign, to which use has given a signification;" it was "a tacit sign of demanding a parley, and shall be as obligatory, as if expressed by words."

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  • 4 years ago

    Surrender Flag

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  • wilker
    Lv 4
    4 years ago

    Waving The White Flag

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  • 4 years ago

    For the best answers, search on this site https://shorturl.im/DW2vr

    Origin The first mention of the usage of white flags to surrender is made during the Eastern Han dynasty (A.D 25–220). In the Roman Empire, the historian Cornelius Tacitus mentions a white flag of surrender in A.D. 109. Before that time, Roman armies would surrender by holding their shields above their heads

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  • 5 years ago

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    RE:

    Why does the white flag mean surrender?

    I've seen it in cartoons, documentaries, books and other places. But why does it mean surrender? How did it originate?

    Source(s): white flag surrender: https://shortly.im/nxsWQ
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  • 6 years ago

    Can a white flag be other than a flag? Could it be a white hat?

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  • mohole
    Lv 5
    10 years ago

    Because it does not carry the symbols, coat-of-arms or insignia of anyone or any country.

    • Thomas4 years agoReport

      Except France, 1815-1830

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  • Anonymous
    10 years ago

    here is all you need to know http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/White_flag

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