Need help identify a insect!!!?

Today i was out insect hunting for my Agriscience class. And when i was looking under a rock i found this grub worm, caterpillar thing.

The main color is red and on its belly it is od color green. I need to identify it and i am having a hard time finding it on the internet.

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  • 9 years ago
    Best Answer

    I don't suppose you might have taken a photo of this? Having a camera handy is always good for documenting methods used and "oddball" things you might find - or at least figure out if it wa a caterpillar or grub. And in asking a question like this, it also helps to know the general geographic region where you found this.

    This is probably the best resource I've found for identifying insects in the US http://bugguide.net/node/view/15740 If you have a photo, you could submit it for an "ID Request".

    You can click on the silhouette to the left which matches an "expected" order - in this case Lepidoptera (if a caterpillar) or Coleoptera (if a grub/larval beetle). Then you can "Browse" images and even set the images to show only larval forms:

    http://bugguide.net/node/view/82/bgpage - 5 pages of caterpillars representing superfamilies of moths

    Grubs are a little more difficult, as you have to "guess" at suborders http://bugguide.net/node/view/60/bgpage or go through a lot of families: http://bugguide.net/node/view/60

    But considering the amount of color you describe, I'd suggest going through the Lepidoptera photos first. Many of the beetle larvae/grubs spend all their time underground, where color is pretty useless. A caterpillar, on the other hand, might crawl under a rock looking for a place to undergo metamorphosis. If you don't find anything in the moth section, you can try the butterfly section of the Lepidoptera: http://bugguide.net/node/view/81/bgpage And just as a thought on the moths - I'd try looking through the Family Sphingiidae (under Superfamily Bombycoidea) first, particulary if the "thing" was larger and/or had a prominent extension ("horn") from the tail end.

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