? asked in Science & MathematicsBiology · 10 years ago

Why does mating type switching in yeast only occur in mother cells and not daughter cells?

Why does mating type switching in yeast only occur in mother cells and not daughter cells

Studying mating type switching in yeasts (mainly Saccharomyces Cerevisae) and came across this sample question. Can't find the answer anywhere. I have a feeling there's something major I'm overlooking, or is it a trick question?

Thanks!

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  • 10 years ago
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    I'll have a stab at this.

    The daughter cell was produced as a result of a mating between two haploid cells, so the daughter is diploid. As such the daughter cell has a copy of each mating type allele. Diploid S. Cerevisae don't mate but will undergo meiosis to produce 4 haploid cells (2 of one mating type, 2 of the other mating type) if conditions are difficult. So as the diploid cells don't mate and have no mating type themselves (they have both mating type alleles) they do not need to/can't (not sure which you'd say) undergo mating type switching.

    Not sure if that's the exact answer but it might help.

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