Why is this English sentence wrong? Could you help me find out the reason ?

Hello. I'm a foreigner learning English. (I live in Asia.)

Now I'm in a difficult situation. My questions might be simple for you, but not for me. This is important for me.

I should be very grateful to you if you might help me.. - As long as you answer me, I hope you are a native. But I will welcome whoever you are if you know English well enough.-

The decision to cut back on production was not sudden, ( ) was rather the result of several months of research.

A: which B: but (I omitted the rest of examples.)

Do you think which of the examples(A or B) is suitable(right) for the blank?

I chose A('which') but it's wrong. I looked up the word, 'rather', in a dictionary, (I found out this structure; 'but rather')

My question ; The problem is that I can't understand the reason 'which' is wrong'.

I know the use of ', which' (in relative clauses).

- The decision to cut back on production was not sudden, which was rather the result of several months of research.-

This sentence doesn't seem to be wrong to me.

Is the reason why 'but' has to be used... because 'rather' exists in the sentence?

If 'rather' left out, is it possible that 'which' is the answer? Is the following sentence right?

- The decision to cut back on production was not sudden, which was the result of several months of research.-

If not, does 'but' have to be used in the sentence if 'rather' dropped?

I'm not sure..exactly. The more I think about it, The more confused I get.

I need your help. Really, I'll appreciate your help.

5 Answers

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  • 10 years ago
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    My first language is English, however I'm not an English grammar teacher but I hope I can help.

    I believe that the proper sentence would be this.

    -The decision to cut back on production was not sudden, but was rather the result of several months or research.-

    This is because the use of the phrase "but was rather" signifies that the reason for the decision to cut back on production was the opposite of what was originally thought.

    The word "which" doesn't sound right here because "rather" is in the sentence. "Rather" is an adverb, which can modify verbs, adjectives (including numbers), clauses, sentences and other adverbs. If "rather" was removed from the sentence then "which" would be perfectly fine to use. It's simply a matter of English syntax.

    However, there are times when you can use "which" and "rather" in the same sentence.

    -I received a sweater from my sister, which was rather soft.-

    The reason you can use it here is because the adverb "rather" is modifying the adjective "soft".

    In the previous sentence you had "rather" come before the noun "result". Adverbs can not modify nouns.

    I hope this answered your question. Good luck on your studies.

    Source(s): Native English speaker
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  • 10 years ago

    The decision to cut back on production was not sudden, rather, it was the result of several months of research.

    I'm no english tacher, rather, im a native speaker, so it just sounds right. Dont trust my comma placement though.

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  • 10 years ago

    You can even drop 'rather' and use only 'but' and the sentence will still make sense. With 'which' it makes no sense.

    Why you need 'but', because the second clause gives you a concept opposing to the fact explained in the first sentence:

    the decision (...) was not sudden, (...) but the result of several month of research.

    the decision was not sudden, but very pondered.

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  • 10 years ago

    i think your answer lies in context and not in the meaning of each word. "rather" could be left out and not change the meaning of the sentence. lets say you are going down a road and reach a fork in the road. "which" direction should you go? (no prior experience to go off of)either direction has unknown outcome. ."but" implies there is some sort of experience that says one way is better than the other.

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  • 10 years ago

    rather

    Source(s): my bwain
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