If you were a bibliotherapist, what books would you “prescribe” for your patients?

If you're unfamiliar with bibliotherapy you can read a basic description of it on Wiki: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bibliotherapy My fantastic freshman year English teacher incorporated bibliotherapy into our curriculum, and taught us how to make reading a healing experience. The literature we read as a... show more If you're unfamiliar with bibliotherapy you can read a basic description of it on Wiki:
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bibliothera...

My fantastic freshman year English teacher incorporated bibliotherapy into our curriculum, and taught us how to make reading a healing experience. The literature we read as a class helped us to understand ourselves better and cope with the problems we were facing at an awkward time of adolescence. She had a gift for recommending books to each of us to read on our own that seemed as if they were tailor-made for the struggles we were personally grappling with at that moment of our lives, and to give us the inspiration and encouragement we needed. We learned about how Maya Angelou used literature to emancipate her mind and find inner strength while reading “I Know Why the Caged Bird Sings,” and it was so empowering to me. The grief and challenges I’ve faced during my teenage years have been so unlike the ones Maya endured growing up, but I could still identify with her in so many ways, and her words became like emotional instruction manuals that helped guide me through so much. I’ve had a difficult year, and her poetry as well as other books I’ve read recently have helped to alter my perspective, provide a needed catharsis, and give me comfort and strength.

I read an article in the LA Times last year about a seventeen-year-old who had spent his childhood being passed around to various foster homes like a hot potato, failed two grades, and got involved in a violent gang at an early age, whose English teacher at the juvenile detention center where he was committed urged him to read "Don Quixote," and the profound impact the book had on his life. He started studying for his GED, writing songs, and looking into colleges.

What books have been the most influential and healing to you? If you were a bibliotherapist, which books would you prescribe to your patients? In particular, if you had one who was a girl in her late teens feeling knocked down by the tides of life, what would you suggest for her to read? : )
Update: My Fair Lady, aka Beelit-Doux ~ Of course I remembered your birthday! : ) I'm surprised it wasn't declared a global holiday, haha. Take your time answering. I extended the question so you won't have to rush.
Update 2: Florence ~ I value your answer, and it isn't rubbish at all. : )
Update 3: You all make it so difficult to pick a best answer.

Thanks everyone. : )
Update 4: Billet ~ There is a massive, multilevel book store in Beijing you would have a blast in. It's right on a popular pedestrian street, and you can get a bird's-eye view from the upper floors and people watch while browsing. You can supposedly see the Forbidden City on clear days, but I was never there on a... show more Billet ~ There is a massive, multilevel book store in Beijing you would have a blast in. It's right on a popular pedestrian street, and you can get a bird's-eye view from the upper floors and people watch while browsing. You can supposedly see the Forbidden City on clear days, but I was never there on a clear day the entire time I was in the city. Oh, and on the very top floor they sell all sort of random things you'd never expect to find in a book store like rice steamers, netbooks, art and ukuleles. I just thought you would find that interesting. : )

Anyway, so they have a small section of books in English, and I was surprised to find "The Bell Jar" in it. I actually bought it over a month ago, long before this question and your answer recommending it, but I was finishing off other books before starting it. This must be a book I'm meant to read.
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