? asked in Education & ReferenceWords & Wordplay · 1 decade ago

Idiom : He got tiptoed off.?

tiptoe off means somebody's feet is off the ground. That means that he fell down to the ground,which means that he is killed. My expanation is right?

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  • ?
    Lv 4
    1 decade ago
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    As a native American English speaker, I have to say that I've never heard this phrase, so your question may not be directed at my demographic. I can only think of three phrases that are close to this, but I hope this helps:

    - If someone is "tipped off", that means (usually) that they were told some confidential information. For instance, if there are people who are manufacturing drugs, and the police "get tipped off", it means someone told the police about these illegal activities. Another example would be the other way around, and that is if the police planned to raid the drug manufacturing facility, but the people who are manufacturing the drugs "got tipped off" about the raid: that means that they were told ahead of time that the police would be coming, and then they were able to hide the traces of their wrongdoing in advance.

    - If you're looking for a phrase you heard that means that someone was killed, there is one slang that is "knocked off." This is used a lot in movies, where someone "gets knocked off" -- that is, the person is killed, usually as part of a contract-for-hire (like you would think of the mafia knocking someone off).

    - If someone "tiptoed off", then they sneaked away. For instance, the museum guide "tiptoed off" after leading a couple to the romantic park area. You wouldn't use "tiptoed off" with "got", though (you'd never say that someone "got tiptoed off").

    If you're sure that the phrase is "got tiptoed off", then I just might not have heard of it before. Good luck!

  • Anonymous
    1 decade ago

    To get tiptoed off is not an American standard expression, what is often incorrectly called idiom. It is hard to guess what it means without any context (I want big points for not typing that in all caps—how can people ask a question like this one and expect a good answer if they won't take the trouble to type the few extra words it would take to let it make sense?). If I had to guess, I would say it was a version of the bum's rush; for example, a bouncer might twist someone's arm up behind his back and walk him out the door such that the person had to walk on tiptoe to keep his arm from being dislocated. It would be like being "led off" or "walked off".

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