Vegans That Wear Wool, Leather, and Silk...Immoral?

Okay, I'm 16 and became a vegan about a month and a half ago. I'm such an unhealthy vegan its pathetic -.-" But i feel that I'm doing something right, sooo yea. Would it be wrong is I wore wool, leather and silk? I mean would that offend other vegans? I'm in rotc, and I have to wear leather shoes in my uniform to pass inspection. And my parents pay for my clothes...so I'm trying to be flexible. And although my parents have been supportive, my mom insists vegans can eat honey; I refuse though. I hate being a burden, I didn't feel that when I was vegetarian but I feel it now. Do you feel like a burden when you eat dinner at friends houses? Since I still live with my parents, I cant do everything I'd like. for example: special shampoo, or something lol..so I try not to be picky. Does that make me horrible? Does it not make me vegan if I wear them, by choice?

Update:

Yea okay, I think it's safe to say, after more research...Lol that if I were to wear the leather and stuff that I'd be considered a "dietary vegan"? I follow the whole avoiding animal products to the extent of what I eat.

And my mother has already said if I'm not healthy she'll force me to revert back to vegetarianism.

And the whole grains thing...yea...but I cant avoid everything

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    I wouldn't say *immoral*, since everyone has different morals, but there's no such thing as a vegan who wears animal "fabrics". And you're right, honey is not vegan. If you're vegan only in what you eat, then you'd be a strict vegetarian, not vegan.

    I don't feel like a burden at friend's houses. I don't expect anyone to go out of their way to make me something elaborate or whatever, or anything at all, for that matter. I'm fine with eating whatever just happens to be vegan, and then filling up on snacks later or something. It's only a big deal if you make it a big deal. Most of my friends are really considerate about having food I'll eat though. My little sister always keeps veggie burgers & such in her freezer just in case I happen to stop by & wind up staying a while or something.

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  • Anonymous
    10 years ago

    There are many problems with this post.

    1. You're 16 and complaining that you can't afford "special" things so you try not to be picky. You're 16. You're in ROTC so you obviously care about becoming more responsible, so why the hell don't you work for your money so YOU can afford to buy YOUR stuff?

    2. Your parents pay for your clothes and you don't want to be a burden...you do realize that vegan clothes, which is made without leather or wool, is CHEAPER than buying stuff made from leather, wool, and silk, right?

    3. You're only a burden if you expect other people to do these things for you, and that's what it sounds like. I think that eating at a friend's house and not offering to help cook or bring a dish is just being a bad dinner guest, even if you weren't vegan. As a vegan, I let the host/ess know that I am vegan and I say, "But don't worry about accommodating me. Let me know what you're planning to serve, and I'll show up early and make vegan versions of what can easily go vegan. That way, you don't have to cook as much or worry about having a vegan for dinner, and I can ensure there's food to eat. It's a win-win situation." Yeah, surprise surprise, no one turns you down when you offer to HELP them.

    4. If you want to be a "dietary vegan," then you're a "strict vegetarian." That's the term for it. Veganism encompasses a lifestyle, not just a diet, so a "dietary vegan" is really an oxymoron.

    5. Your mother says if you aren't healthy she'll make you be vegetarian again, and you admit that you're "such an unhealthy vegan" but shrug it off thinking that you're doing something right? Look, learn to eat properly so you can be healthy.

    Source(s): vegan bodybuilder and personal trainer
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  • Anonymous
    10 years ago

    If you remain a vegetarian/vegan for a long time, you will learn that *everyone* has a different take on the "right" way to live ~ regardless of whether they are a veggie, vegan, or meat eater. I have been vegetarian for nearly 20years & am comfortable with MY decisions ~ as such, I don't preach my lifestyle to others, but am happy to explain if asked =)

    Anyhow, here is what works for me ~ I TRY my hardest to use cruelty-free products when I purchase makeup, shampoo, household cleaners, etc. However, sometimes it just isn't possible, whether it's due to personal preference for one product over another, or financial reasons, etc. But I don't feel guilty when I use a non-cruelty free product. Rather, I feel good that the majority of the products I buy are made by conscientious companies who do not test on animals.

    Regarding clothing, I almost never buy leather ~ it's funny you mention boots, because I find it very hard to find good quality shoes from man made products. I'm a nurse, and leather shoes offer the best protection from body fluids (yuck!!!) and the best comfort for my feet after 12+ hours at work. Like beauty/cleaning products ~ 90% of my shoes are from natural, man made materials. But, occasionally I have to turn to leather. Yes, I feel horribly guilty when I do it, but I don't beat myself up over it.

    So, I guess what I'm trying to say is that you are not horribe by not sticking 100% to a vegan lifestyle. Feel good about the choices you do make, and the positive effect you are having on animals and the environment.

    Regarding feeling like a burden ~ yes, I do feel like a burden when I eat out! After all these years.... it doesn't bother me so much at other people's houses. After all, I don't want others to judge my lifestyle, so if they have a lot of meat I politely skip it & assure them I had plenty to eat (even if I didn't!)

    But I do hate going out to a restaraunt with my meat-eating family & inlaws. As a veggie/vegan I am sure you have noticed that the best restaraunt options are either ethnic or small, independent places that aren't really appropriate for a big family dinner.It bugs me that they frequently choose steak places whose only non-meat option is a baked potato and house salad :( I know that when we skip the steak places and go to a restaraunt we all agree on, they feel like they have made a big sacrafice for me, but I don't think they ever stopped to consider that I am also making a sacrafice for them. My family/in-laws never consider that by agreeing on a bland chain restaraunt I only have a choice of 1 or maybe 2 entrees ~ which still sucks! Even if it is better than making a "meal" out of the vegetable sides at a meat place. They just see that I am once again making them forfeit an awesome steak dinner at an awesome steak house *sigh*

    Long story short ~ being veggie/vegan means a lifetime of figuring out what works for you and being true to yourself. It is tough! But don't worry about what you "should" do ~ be proud for what you *have* done =) Good luck!

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  • 10 years ago

    If you have to wear leather for the rotc I can't blame you. I take it you plan to go into the army when you are an adult. Anyway maybe you'll be the one to get them to change the materials of the boots from leather.

    Also when it comes to veganism, health is first and foremost and the others come afterwards. So as long as you are getting the proper nutrients worry about using products that are vegan comes second. Also there are convenient, frugal products that are vegan.

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  • 4 years ago

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  • Karina
    Lv 6
    10 years ago

    Isn't the ROTC supposed to teach you about responsibility? You're responsible for your own lifestyle and your own choices. Veganism is not a diet - it's a lifestyle. Vegans do not wear wool, leather, fur, and silk. If you have to wear leather boots for ROTC, ask them if you can get a different version of the boots. If they don't allow it, then fine, you can't help that. But don't go out and wear other leather products. If you don't like what your parents are buying you, then tell them you don't want to wear these things. Or buy them yourself. Find a job and buy your own clothes. Vegans do not eat honey. Tell your mom that. And like others said, you're only a burden if you make yourself one. Make your own meals to eat. When you go to a friend's house, bring vegan food that everybody can enjoy or offer to help cook the meal and make a vegan portion for yourself. And all the cruelty-free products - if your mom doesn't want to buy them for you, go and buy them yourself. Right now you are not a vegan; you are strict vegetarian, and there is a huge difference between the two,

    Source(s): vegan
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  • 10 years ago

    Wow first I want to say that you sound like a great person being concerned about being a burden and all that, that's very nice of you to be considerate about your parents and others. I think until you move out on your own, that you shouldn't be too picky and use whatever your parents get you. If you have to wear leather shoes for school, then don't make a big deal about it, just wear it knowing it's for school only and you don't have to buy any other ones. If it's too expensive for your parents to buy the special shampoo then just use what they get and when you're older you can buy your own. That is very mature of you.

    As far as being considered vegan if you wear leather, silk etc, yes, you would still be 100% vegan because vegan is only about what you eat and if you want to extend it to clothing and other animal products, then that falls into the category of being an environmentalist but yes, most vegans would avoid those products but like I said as long as your diet is vegan that's the only thing that constitutes the label. Good luck.

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  • Daisy
    Lv 7
    10 years ago

    Animal byproducts are in virtually everything you touch every day. There is animal glue in your book bindings, the chairs you set on, the computers you use, the roads you drive on, electric transmission requires animal by products, animal byproducts help lubricate equipment for major manufacturing companies.

    So, IMO, you shouldn't be worried about whether you're accepted as "vegan" because you wear leather shoes. Get over the idea that when someone claims they don't use ANY animal products that they're something special. Unless they're living in a cave and getting all their nutrition from wild berries, it's not true. And if they lived in a cave, how could they be telling the rest of us how superior they are?

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  • 10 years ago

    Well, vegans don't use ANY animal products. And you need to make sure you are healthy. If you aren't healthy, you shouldn't go veg. =D Your health should come first, before vegetarian lifestyles.

    Source(s): I'm vegan. =D And do your research.
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  • exsft
    Lv 7
    10 years ago

    Immoral against what?? And what does the opinion of other vegans have to do with your life?? Its your life not theirs and offending people who have nothing to do or say about your life should be the least of your worries

    Live your life the way you think is best not because a bunch of strangers think it's "immoral"

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