What language was the Torah Originally written in, that was given at Mount Sinai?

the language spoken by the clan of Abraham was a dialect closely akin to those of Moab, Tyre, and Sidon, and it bore a greater resemblance to Assyrian and Arabic than to Aramaic. This was about 2000BC. First alphabetic script (coptic) developed by Semitic workers in Egypt was about 1800-1500 BC Hebrew Captivity... show more the language spoken by the clan of Abraham was a dialect closely akin to those of Moab, Tyre, and Sidon, and it bore a greater resemblance to Assyrian and Arabic than to Aramaic.
This was about 2000BC.
First alphabetic script (coptic) developed by Semitic workers in Egypt was about 1800-1500 BC
Hebrew Captivity in Egypt as about 1730 BC and ended about 1447 BC
Torah the first five books of the Bible: Genesis, Exodus, Leviticus, Numbers and Deuteronomy, sometimes called the Pentateuch
written about 1447BC 1400BC.
are there any other influences to the written scriptures that say they were not in Coptic?
Update: not sure what race has to-do with the language.
I have spoken English most of my life but when immersed in other cultures picked up that language.
The same for the written form.
what I am looking for is references to how written Hebrew came into existence and was it at the these were written.
Update 2: I checked out your first reference to school of Israeli archeology and found this
http://www.crossroad.to/articles2/08/arc...
Update 3: 1377 bc Akhnaton becomes pharaoh; inaugurates monotheistic reforms
this was well after the exodus(1447 bc).
Update 4: I pick up you quoting for the Quaran.
Mohamed was not born till 570 AD and died 632 AD. that does not make him an eye witness to events just like us.
Update 5: in having some discussion with some outside of Y answers I believe I am beginning to see a pattern. Hebrew does not adhere to a language but to a message. so the fact written text went from cuneiform to Aramaic it is not the big item, since there was not real translation but a restatement of the message in the... show more in having some discussion with some outside of Y answers I believe I am beginning to see a pattern.
Hebrew does not adhere to a language but to a message.
so the fact written text went from cuneiform to Aramaic it is not the big item, since there was not real translation but a restatement of the message in the new language.
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