How can "God's Word" be "perfect" if imperfect beings interpret it?

I am an author (I just finished my third novel). Consequently, I understand that a piece of writing really consists of two things: 1) the words themselves and 2) the interpretations of those who read the words. As a writer, I can really only control the first one of those. "God's Word" -- if such... show more I am an author (I just finished my third novel). Consequently, I understand that a piece of writing really consists of two things: 1) the words themselves and 2) the interpretations of those who read the words. As a writer, I can really only control the first one of those.

"God's Word" -- if such a thing actually appears in one of our various holy texts -- cannot logically be perfect unless a perfect interpreter reads it. Even if such a perfect interpretation was possible, how would any of the rest of us identify it? Look at all the different ways that different Christian denominations interpret Scripture. The Bible says that God is "not the author of confusion." Could have fooled me.
Update: imrod: I don't disagree with you . . . entirely. You are, however, wrong about my novels: they are imperfect to the reader who misses something or derives an interpretation from them that wasn't intended. Yes, the Bible's words could be perfect in and of themselves; yet, they could not truly be... show more imrod: I don't disagree with you . . . entirely. You are, however, wrong about my novels: they are imperfect to the reader who misses something or derives an interpretation from them that wasn't intended. Yes, the Bible's words could be perfect in and of themselves; yet, they could not truly be perfect in the eyes of a mere mortal who has no way of knowing that his interpretation of them is perfect. That was my single point.
Update 2: If only more people would listen to mary. She is one of the few responders who posted something sensible.
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