Out of college unable to find a job ?

Well I just graduated college with a General Arts & Science Certificate, and now I'm looking for a full time job. I'm not really sure what want but it's difficult and I can't seem to make much progress. I'm live in Ontario, and the city where I'm from hardly has any jobs available. I looked into the Canadian Forces as an option, however they aren't really in high demand at the moment and the jobs that are available require "technical skills".

I dunno where to look, I was toying with the idea of possibly heading to Uni in January 2011, I feel like my current level of education isn't enough. But in the meantime, 6 months until then I need to find something.

Any ideas ?

I also thought about overseas work, but I'm not sure how that process works. Do you know of any hands on jobs that are in high demand overseas ?

Thanks, I really despise the feeling of not working, being unemployed is enough to drive a man to suicide.

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  • Mizz G
    Lv 5
    10 years ago
    Favorite Answer

    One of my friends was in a similar situation as you a few years back when she just graduated with a Bachelor of Commerce degree. At first she took up work at a sandwich job just to earn enough bucks to pay the bills and buy some time while she applies for a "real job". A few months later she got hired by the Ministry of Business and Trade in her country of residence. It's a good job that develops her as a professional, pays well, and comes with great benefits and vacations.

    Going back to school for graduate studies is what I dream to do! Sure, if you think it will help you dig out your potential and shine, then go for it. But take also into account stuff like your age, your goals, and developments in the job market. As far as going back to school is concerned, timing is everything; neither too soon or too late is good.

    If you are over 25 and not a citizen of a country which requires mandatory military service, then you might want to work a little bit longer before you go back to school. Why? Because having a high education increases your salary bid in the job market, but doesn't necessarily equip you with the skills necessary to survive in the "real world" of that profession. It makes you expensive, and prospective employers don't like that when you're lacking work experience.

    When you were studying General Arts & Science, what career plans did most of your classmates have, and what jobs were frequently mentioned? What are your hobbies? Worthy causes you care about? Passions in which your degree could be applied? Which company names ever appeared in the case studies you did in college? What was your final paper or project about? Answering these questions should at least give you a better idea of the kinds of possible jobs you could apply for. Maybe you should have thought about it since last year.

    I don't know much about your degree, and I could be wrong, but I'm guessing that any manufacturing company with a research and development department could use someone with a General Arts & Science Certificate. Perhaps food companies? Pharmaceutical? Consumer electronics?

    About working overseas, I actually know a number of Canadians working in my city (Jakarta, Indonesia) as expatriate teachers. The pay must be good and so are the vacations; I just went travelling with some of them to Israel recently, and from there they still went to backpack a month in Europe. Other than teaching, perhaps you may want to look at NGO's with overseas operations. Pick a worthy cause that you care about, or a country that you're interested in, then check out what's available. An Australian lady who is a very good friend of my mom's has been living in Aceh and Padang for about 5 years doing disaster relief projects. My neighbour was a Vietnamese woman who works for a food relief organization.

    Another way to get overseas jobs is to work for multinational companies. My Dad works for an American mining company and has colleagues from the U.S., Canada, Australia, New Zealand, Malaysia, Japan, Africa, Middle East, and Chile. They serve various functions, from the dirty fieldwork, doing research, environmental consulting, public relations, marketing management, auditing, community development, and even jobs you didn't think have anything to do with mining like doctors, legal consulting, and school teaching (there is a school managed by the mining company for the children of its employees who are living in its jobsite in the remote tropical rainforests). In that case you apply for the job in your country (consider travelling interstate); and either negotiate for an international placement up front, or first work in the local office while keeping your eye on opportunities to get transferred overseas. It may be helpful if you know somebody who already works for that company, so you can ask them which negotiation would be more feasible.

    Good luck!

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  • 4 years ago

    2

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  • 4 years ago

    What you learn from books does not teach you the job. Anyone can "talk" a good job, but only those who have experience can do it productively and effectively. I have sympathy with your view, but an employer would rather have someone who has worked their way up and knows the job inside out than someone who knows all the theory yet has not had the practice. Tis the old "chicken and egg" equation. I am in the UK, none of our Prime Ministers had done the job before, they were expected to have worked their way up the ranks. Very often it is the "minions" who have more insight and influence than those at the top. Where the argument fails is when those successful minions are so beguiled/overruled by THEIR minions, that they lose sight of their original intentions. Accept the fact that our leaders do not operate in isolation or from some sense of philanthropy, they soon learn that they are merely figureheads, mouthpieces for others, the masters soon become the puppets. Only in dictatorships does the leader have ultimate power, and we can see around us today where that has led.and been countenanced! In a so called democracy the leader quickly learns their place, experience is not the issue, being able to fool most of the people some of the time is the master plan. The puppet masters always ensure the "best" candidate wins. Look at Reagan, look at Bush, to name but two, either America is mad, or the system is corrupt, as are all "alleged" democracies. You pays your money etc. Get "Joe Bloggs" to run the country, he has more experience, more insight, more nous than any of them, yet he would be eaten alive because he has been elected to serve the people and not the masters.

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  • 10 years ago

    With your degree you are limited to what you can do. I think your best options is to get some type of technical certification for a trade. That way you can work in the trade and as you build experience you can transition to management because of your college degree. You can also start by getting a job in retail/food and work your way up to a supervisor and then into management. It takes time, you won't start making the big bucks like some of your engineer friends but eventually if you stick to something you can get into management and earn a decent living.

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  • Anonymous
    10 years ago

    what kind of work are you even qualified to do with that type of degree? - doesn't sound very promising to ever get a job with a degree like that

    how is college different than University? in the USA, they are the same - college comes after 12 yrs of primary/high school

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  • 10 years ago

    I find it hard to beleive Ontario has no jobs. Part of the problem is a General degree is...well...too general. I also find it VERY hard to swallow that the Armed Forces can't train you in a position.

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  • Anonymous
    10 years ago

    You will have to figure out your skill levels with Microsoft Office suites and your typing speed. Improve them if you need to. You will then have to find work that may not be in your field but you have other skills that will work. You will have to be less picky.

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  • 4 years ago

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