What type of oil to use during glass cutting?

Its said that it is best used when cutting glass to apply oil to the cutter, i saw written here that kerosene oil can be used, i dont believe i have kerosene oil in the house... is there some sort of substitute i can use instead?

thank you!

8 Answers

Relevance
  • 1 decade ago
    Favorite Answer

    Just use water. Kerosene is better though.

    Source(s): Done it
  • Anonymous
    4 years ago

    Glass Cutting Oil

  • Anonymous
    5 years ago

    This Site Might Help You.

    RE:

    What type of oil to use during glass cutting?

    Its said that it is best used when cutting glass to apply oil to the cutter, i saw written here that kerosene oil can be used, i dont believe i have kerosene oil in the house... is there some sort of substitute i can use instead?

    thank you!

    Source(s): type oil glass cutting: https://biturl.im/wTyvL
  • Anonymous
    5 years ago

    For the best answers, search on this site https://shorturl.im/avANN

    You should focus in just a few things very and very important before buying the bottle at the grocery store: 1)What should I read on the label? The most significant information is the date of harvest together with the expiration date. Did you know that olive oil loses fruitness and flavor as it ages and after maximum two years from the harvest it will be oxidated and rancid? 2)The importance of the packaging. A dark bottle, a bottle wrapped in foil, a bottle packaged in cardboard or wooden box is a MUST to preserve the quality of the oil because it is a MUST to keep it away from the direct light. 3)Is the color of the olive oil important? ABSOLUTELY NOT! Official tasters always use dark glasses so that their sense is not influenced by the color. Many times oils too green are chemically manipulated because the customer belief is the more green the color is the more good the oil will be. This is absolutely wrong! After you've bought it: An official extra virgin olive oil tasting is performed after the chemical test to determine if the oil meets the standards. The tasters must follow rules of conduct that have been established by the IOOC. Our experience with not food professionals taught us that anyone can learn to taste well. You can replicate at home the same procedure professional olive oil tasters follow to judge olive oil. To start your tasting experience, you'll just need a small plastic cup, a bottle of olive oil and a glass of water. You'll have a better result if you don't drink coffee or smoke at least 30 minutes before the time set for your test and if you don't use any perfume, cosmetic or soap whose could linger during the test. Usually we suggest to taste at least three or four different oils made with different species of olives to discover different flavors and intensities. Pour just a small quantity of olive oil in the cup (enough to cover the bottom), hold the cup top and bottom between your hands to warm it slightly and swirl it for at least one minute. Remove your hand and smell the oil. Keep in mind that extra virgin olive oil should smell and taste of the fruit from which it is made...it should be fruity and olivey. You should smell something like olive, fresh cut grass, aromatic herbs or fresh fruit, that are considered positive attributes. If not, you could have just a flat olive oil with no flavor or a bad one that could be defined rancid, old, metallic, musty-humid, fusty or winey. If you recognize you are smelling the second one you should not procede with the tasting because your palate will be affected by these defects (and you'll need the glass of water you have prepared before!). If the smell is good and you've found the positive attributes then take a tiny sip and let it work in your mouth. Swirl it around and suck in air to oxigenate the oil. Taste it some more and then swallow. Take notes on your sensations and impressions. Remember that every extra virgin olive oil works in your mouth in a different way and with a different time so...let it work!

  • How do you think about the answers? You can sign in to vote the answer.
  • Anonymous
    6 years ago

    Basically cutter oil is used for cutting a glass. Cutter oil is used along with a glass cutter to cut glass for many different purposes.

  • Anonymous
    5 years ago

    Look for Extra-Virgin Olive oil made in either Italy or Spain. These are usually very good. When you know what good olive oil tastes like, you can experiment with other brands, country manufacturers etc. Since good olive oil can be somewhat pricey, buy small bottles first to try before buying bigger bottles or cans. When you first open it, pour a little of it on bread to taste. You will learn what good olive oil tastes like. Good luck!

  • Anonymous
    1 decade ago

    U don't need oil, just clean the with soap. All it does to keep dust off from build up at the cutter, when scorch the glass

  • 1 decade ago

    Sewing machine oil is fine.

Still have questions? Get your answers by asking now.