Maybe I'm over-analyzing, but aren't farms in general cruel to animals?

Destruction to habitats..

Pest control to keep crops safe..

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  • 10 years ago
    Best Answer

    Industrial farms are generally cruel to animals, however not all farms fall under the factory farm definition. Smaller farms usually take better care of the animals, since they usually can't replace them as easily. I apologize in advance, this will be quite long, but I won't go into everything in the interest of keeping it short.

    Industrial farms keep animals in feed lots, which are the small pens filled with as many animals as they can pack in there. They are generally dirty, partially because they are not cleaned often enough, and partially because there is improper waste management for such a large amount of animals in such a small area. The reason it is done this way, is because it is more cost effective.

    Many laying chickens are kept in cramped containers, and their beaks are trimmed in order to prevent cannibalism which occurs when one chicken in a pen is injured, and can also happen when the chickens are bored. Dairy cattle on industrial farms are milked in a parlor system, the animal is not tied up, they are moved from pen to pen and into the parlor. Contrary to what I have heard on here a few times, these cows are not milked non stop, they are milked (generally) between 2-3 times a day, every day, generally for about 10 months (much like a human) or until shortly before the birth of their next calf, some farms give them a few months, some only a few days. These cattle are kept in dirty pens, and usually end up slipping in the (nearly liquid) feces, resulting in injuries that often end in the animal being permanently injured, or put down. Chickens used for meat are generally kept alive for 35-42 days, the buildings they are kept in are not cleaned during this time. The buildings have many fans to help dissipate the chicken stench, and to keep the interior of the buildings a decent temperature (and keep the chickens from killing each other, see above, or dying from the heat). Pig farms, the pigs are kept in buildings grouped according to age. Generally they are kept in pens with slotted floors, the slots allow the feces and urine to fall into the lagoon (a pit filled with manure). Yes, pigs can break legs in these slots, and are then considered useless and killed. The sows (female pigs) giving birth are kept in small pens, and many times do not allow the mother pig to get up, or really move. However, this keeps the sows from killing/eating their young, which can happens, and seems to more frequently in bored/unhappy animals. I can't say much for sheep farms since the sheep farmers I know are all small scale, and treat their animals well. I know very little against veal farms, for the simple fact that I am (and have always been) 100% against veal, generally the calves are very young, and fed a strict diet of milk and the animals are kept in small pens to prevent movement (keeps meat more tender along with the milk).

    Many farms spray crop fields with insecticide and fertilizers, these always cause run off, and it can be detrimental to the environment. In the state of SD there are very few places that have well water (even in rural areas) simply because there has been so much run off in the water. Granted, much of that pollution was caused in the early 1900's, but to this day that state is terrible about spraying chemicals. It should be noted that many households (not farms) also cause quite a bit of run off due to the use weedkillers, lawn fertilizers, and various other spray chemicals. It may seem like they should not be nearly as responsible as farms, but most farms learn about proper usage of the chemicals they use, and they are often held more accountable by the government for misuse. The fields themselves do contribute to destruction or habitat, but as someone noted before, many animals still live in crop fields or feed from them, so the destruction is minimized. And also as stated, housing developments destroy more habitat since they are not only inhospitable to animals, many animals are killed to ensure they do not enter the developments.

    I will let you make your own decisions, but I feel that big farms are terrible for the environment (but smaller farms usually can't make enough money to survive) as are people that use chemicals without thinking about the risks and possible effects of those chemicals. I hope this answers your question.

    Source(s): I really want to press the point that I'm not against farmers in general, I'm against the factory farms that abuse/neglect animals and the environment. Years of working on farms, knowing farmers, and general observation of growing up on a farm.
  • 10 years ago

    Farms are actually not such a big problem to nature as people make it out to seem. lots of deer run through corn fields and eat the corn. The farms that I live around actually only spray for bugs. its possible that rodents eat these, but even still, its nothing compared to what housing does to animals. Farmers remove the local vegetation and plant a "valuable" crop such as corn, wheat, cotton, and milo just to name a few. houses and duplexes and subdivisions, put concrete and steel in place of those crops or grasses. they push nearby animals out of their natural habitat whereas on a farm, the animals adapt.

    Ranches on the other hand is usually pretty cruel in their treatment of animals. most milk suppliers give animals drugs to make them produce more milk. hence, the milk is lower and both natural sugars and cream. the animals are usually kept unsanitary conditions whether for milk or meat production, and not allowed much movement. The same is true for a lot poultry farms and the people who handle pigs and pork products.

    Hope this was able to answer some of your questions.

    P.S. Generally speaking, a farm grows plants, a ranch handles animals.

    Source(s): Month long study of farms and ranches of California (2007)
  • Anonymous
    10 years ago

    everything is cruel to animals.our world has become way too dependent on animals and instaed of us treating them good for helping us we are cruel. the term"biting the hand that feeds us"works perfectly here. as for destruction of habitat..we think that we own the earth when actually others are sharing it too.pest control comes from not caring about our earth.

  • 10 years ago

    Not only that but have you noticed their are not pig pens any more and chicken coops in big company farms its all chickens in one small house where they live in the size of a shoebox forced to lay eggs and not allowed to move unless its chicken that will be eaten then they are thrown in large fenced area and have about in a small area 500 chickens in a small room about the size of a bedroom. Cows are feed food that they normally cant eat except for years of forcing down their throats since its cheaper cows are raised like plants in a single row and when they get killed they don't even die in the outside there they are thrown in a large factory and slaughtered. not to touch a sensitive area but it makes the jewish massacre look like happy farm. Pigs are not washed and are feed the crap of all the food left overs and soy beans. If you want to learn more about Cruelty of farms and the Food industry watch and support these documentary's: Super size me, Food Inc, Earthlings and Fast food nation.

    Please help the animals they were never meant for this kind of abuse

    P.s Dont watch earthlings unless your willing to possibly pass out from it

    Source(s): From my envomental teacher Mr. Wofle if you wish to get intouch with him his email is : Mwofle@sd38.bc.ca
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  • Anonymous
    10 years ago

    well if you feel that way you can just move out of your house and give it to one of the millions of people who are homeless. your house was built on animals habitat. and you do pest control to keep your yard. hypocrite.

    Source(s): isn't life overall cruel? get used to it.
  • Anonymous
    10 years ago

    Yes, the world is cruel.

  • 10 years ago

    Very good point, I'm sure there are farmer's have a special permit that acts as an all-access to farm animals...cough* slaughter cough*

  • Anonymous
    10 years ago

    Yes, produce farms (fruit, vegetables, nuts, legumes) destroy habitat and use pesticides also.

  • 10 years ago

    It is cruel in some ways but we need farm anmals for food in stuff

  • Anonymous
    10 years ago

    Yes you are. Have you ever been on a farm? Your ignorance is astounding.

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