Anonymous
Anonymous asked in Society & CultureLanguages · 1 decade ago

How do you pronounce Artaxšaçā?

It's Persian.

Update:

The modern version you gave me is of Ardeshir. Not the version I asked for.

2 Answers

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  • 1 decade ago
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    Modern Persian pronunciation:

    http://www.forvo.com/word/%D8%A7%D8%B1%D8%AF%D8%B4...

    Old Persian:

    𐎠𐎼𐎭𐎧𐎨𐏁𐎨

    Here are the pronunciation of the potentially confusing letters:

    a: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:Open_front_unrou...

    r is rolled

    t is with tongue touching back of upper teeth

    x: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:Voiceless_velar_...

    š = sh

    ç: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:Voiceless_palata...

    ā is like a but longer

    The emphasis is on the last syllable.

    Hope this helps :-D

    Addendum: I gave you the link to the Modern Persian pronunciation, but I also gave you great detail of how to pronounce "Artaxšaçā" in Old Persian, which the other answerer fails to do (as it is not said this way in Persian at all anymore). Please take the time to hear the pronunciations of each phoneme carefully, and YES, I believe that I mentioned that the emphasis is on the last syllable.

    Source(s): Linguist
  • 1 decade ago

    The first answerer is almost correct.

    What you asked for is "Ardeshir Shah".

    "Shah" is king in Persian, so the whole phrase means: "King Ardeshir".

    When pronouncing, the stress for all nouns in Persian is on the last syllable, consider this when pronouncing "Ardeshir".

    /ar.de.'shir/

    The 'a' in "Ardeshir" has the same pronunciation as 'a' in "apple".

    The 'de' part is like the 'de' in "desk".

    'shir' part is pronounced like ''sheer" but without the last 'e' before 'r'. (Imagine you pronounce English letter E longer than usual.)

    /shah/

    'sh' part is the same as 'sh' in "she".

    For the 'ah' part, take "aha!" word in English and remove the final 'a', so that it becomes 'ah' (no vowel after 'h' but it is still pronounced).

    Connect this to the 'sh' mentioned earlier.

    Source(s): Native Persian speaker in Iran
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