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Anonymous asked in PetsDogs · 1 decade ago

Which dog breed is the hardest to have as a pet?

I currently own one German Shepherd but my family helps me take care of it. Other than the German Shepherd I have not really owned a dog before. Overall it is a pretty fun dog to have as a pet and I like it a lot, I am kind of set on owning that one breed exclusively my whole life.

Now as of late I have had this curiosity of trying out one of the "Spitz" dog breeds like the Husky and I heard they are really tough to own as pets.

I am wondering, which dog breed is the hardest to take care of and have as a pet? Like which one is most likely to drive its owners crazy.

9 Answers

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  • 1 decade ago
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    I'm not sure which is the worst, but huskies are definitely one of them. If you get one that doesn't dig, chew, howl, bark, chase cats, escape the yard, break its leash, or do just about any other obnoxious activity a dog can do, then you're just plain lucky and got the exception to the breed. Either that or you've been providing sufficient exercise--which is EXTENSIVE by the way--and mental stimulation.

    Huskies are awful dogs to have as a pet if you can't take up an hour long daily jog. Poor weather isn't an excuse, either. Even show sibes are still hardcore working dogs and would happily run 20 miles if you let them. At absolute minimum they require one our of intense exercise every day, in the form of jogging or load pulling or both. While they are generally content to lounge about the house, a bored husky cannot be trusted outdoors, even in a fenced yard, unattended. They cannot be trusted off leash EVER. The vast majority will run away and come back when they want to, if at all.

    Huskies aren't very loyal dogs, either. They love you as any other dog does, but they also love the complete stranger that walks into your yard with a leash saying in an excited voice "DOGGIE GO WALKIES!?" They'll happily follow him out to his car and never be seen or heard from again.

    They also require extensive grooming. By extensive I don't mean trips to the groomer, special clips, or anything like that, but daily brushing all year round is necessary to keep shedding under control. They blow their coat twice a year. It falls out in chunks twice a year. Brushing daily during the warm months is necessary unless you like dog fur carpeting. :P

    Most applies to the Malamute and Samoyed as well, though I believe the Samoyed is a little more mellow and forgiving for an inexperienced handler. Spitz breeds, including norwegian elk hounds, akitas, and chows, require a firm, confident, but gentle leader. They don't respond well, if at all, to yelling or hitting and may just decide "screw this" and run off. They require large amounts of exercise as all are energetic dogs. As I said, they may be content to laze around the house but once you get them outdoors you can't trust most of them off leash, especially huskies, mals, and akitas. They love to just run run run and they will whether you go with them or not lol.

    Some of the other spitz breeds (malamutes, chows, and akitas) are prone to aggression if not properly trained and handled. They're definitely higher on the difficulty list than huskies for that reason. Huskies may be destructive when bored, but they generally don't hurt people. Malamutes and Akitas are known to be aggressive when not handled correctly.

    [Add] Very General is right, the smaller spitz breeds --Alaskan Klee Kai, American Eskimo, Pomeranian, etc--tend to be easier to handle. They're companion dogs first and foremost, and are bred to be companion dogs, not working dogs. That obnoxious stubbornness isn't as deeply ingrained.

    ASM--genetics don't work that way. You don't automagically get the best of both breeds in a mix. Usually you get some random mix. Sometimes you get all the good OR all the bad. It's a crapshoot. Don't believe me? Grab a high school biology book and flip through to genetics.

    Huskies are, ironically, one of my favorite breeds to own.

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  • 1 decade ago

    The answer to your question is subjective. Every dog owner will tell you their dog is the best. I've been working in veterinary hospitals for over 30 years. I've seen little dogs that are sweet and the same breed try to take my face off. I've seen Goldens who were adorable and the same again try to bite. Take advantage of your wonderful internet (like you already are) and study. In my personal opinion a mix breed from the shelter is always a good bet. You get the best of a mix of breeds. Always consider the predominant breed of the mix and study up on that. Huskys and Spitz are high energy dogs, frequently suffer from anxiety, in my opinion and require lots of exercise and TLC not to mention grooming. The need to be active, and have a job or a purpose other than sitting in the house or yard. We've had some very sweet dogs (in this working class) come in and some that were so neurotic that we have to be extremely cautious. A lot of a dog's ease of care has to do with the owner. Yes, there are areas to consider like grooming, size, diet and pre disposition to disease to consider. Also consider whether you're an active person, a home body, away at work a lot, and have the finances to give your dog the care it needs. Study, study. You'll never have a better friend than your dog....but you have to choose the right one for yourself and its a serious and long-term commitment. I applaud you for taking the first steps to learn more before going out and grabbing the first cutie pie you find. Good Luck.

    Source(s): Years of vet office experience and many dogs in my life.
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  • 4 years ago

    The only real working dogs that don't have to have obedience to be an asset are probably sight hounds. If sight hounds are well fed, they'll kill it and bring it back to the pack, {me}. I think it's possible to use a driven dog for a working purpose and have it be a good pet. The best pet dogs are happy fulfilled ones. And I don't think it's impossible to train a working dog that has been a pet, with the right trainer and under the right circumstances. It's impossible to use a pet that does not have breed drive. As others have said, a lot of breeds have problems with atypical temperaments. A dog in a pet home with an atypical temperament can NOT be trained to do the job, whatever that may be. I have to add, @ Elaine, what on earth are you talking about? I sure as hell didn't teach my Afghans how to open the refrigerator, or how to turn door knobs and get in the room with the cat box in it, or how to open every gate, or how to out think a Jack Rabbit, Coyote, or Antelope, they figured all that and more out on their own, you can't tell me dogs don't think.

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  • 1 decade ago

    Really depends on what kind of person you are. If you're the kind who likes to run (not walk) for several blocks, than a chihuahua wouldn't be the dog for you. If you're a couch potatoe, then you don't want a dog that has to have a job.

    The best you can do is research the breed, decide how well they go with your life style, and then hope the dog you either buy or adopt conforms to the standard.

    Source(s): experience mostly.
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  • 1 decade ago

    It depends on your life style. For a lot of people the Border Collie is an impossible breed, but for the right person they are a godsend.

    As beautiful as Huskies are, knowing what I know about my Husky mix, they are not the right dog for me. If I were interested in the Spitz dog breeds, I'd look at some of the smallest (less exercise) like an American Eskimo or an Alaskan Klee Kai.

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  • 1 decade ago

    Healthwise, Bulldogs are the hardest. I owned two of them. An old English bulldog and a French bulldog. Although they are sweet and intelligent ( but sometimes crazy) and they make my day complete, I have been spending a lot of money as they always have something that requires medical attention. They also have medical insurance of they're own otherwise, I will be spending more. The life span is also to short according to scientific studies that will make you always worry about them specially if you get too attached with them. I loved them so much and I hope they outlived me. It is worthwhile owning them. Huskies are not really tough to own but they are not a guard dog type.

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  • 1 decade ago

    Any breed is hardest for unexperienced dog owner who don't know how to train it properly

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  • 1 decade ago

    The untrained and not socialized breed

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  • 1 decade ago

    i think it depends on the person, bc every breedsattitide is totally different, but in my opinion id say a rottweiler or whoever ya spell it, not sayin i hate them either ppl

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