? asked in Politics & GovernmentMilitary · 10 years ago

Should I join the military after I get my college degree?

Okay so here's the story.

I'm a senior in high school right now, looking forward to going to college. I've always had a sense to join the military, but I really want to become a teacher as well.

I want to go to college first, and get my degree in either Elementary or Secondary Education, so I'll be able to get a job right away after college. I was thinking about joining the US military AFTER college and spending some time there before spending the rest of my life as a teacher.

NOTE: I wouldn't be going in the military to try and become an officer, I would be going to be a standard recruit, a trigger puller, and maybe go on to SpecOps or something.

People are telling me the military will pay for my college, but I don't want to join just yet. I don't wanna commit to the military and then go to college on their dime. I want to go college first and if I still have an interest in the military, I might join it. But I need help with the decision.

Help?

What are pros?

What are some cons?

Is it a smart decision to do this?

Update:

I know I MIGHT not still want to do it, which is why I'm going to college first, so I'm not LOCKED into the military.

I'm just asking is it a smart choice to join the military even AFTER I have a college degree

12 Answers

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  • Logan
    Lv 4
    10 years ago
    Best Answer

    I will speak about what I know which is the Marine Corps and a little bit of Navy. Nothing against the Army or Air Force route, I am just not as well versed in those services.

    I spent 8 years enlisted and I am hitting 2 years as an officer. If I was only going to spend 4 years in and try to get the most out of it I would have just done 4 as an officer. I had the same mentality when I joined. I wanted to be a grunt and I enlisted as one with some college. Some of the experience was good, but I found that I wasn't challenged and spent a lot of time doing things I did not anticipate that caused resentment. This began to change as a Corporal and got better as a SSgt which you would not reach in one enlistment anyways so it is a moot point.

    2 years as an officer not as a grunt anymore, and I couldn't be happier in my current MOS or if I would have decided to stay in the infantry. I received far better training as a non-grunt at TBS than I did in an infantry unit. If you want action then try to select infantry as an officer after college. The pay is better, the training is better, the responsibilities come immediately, you get a better view of the grand scheme of things in 4 years, and it will prepare you better for follow on jobs in education or administration, plus you already have the main pre-requisite of a college degree.

    If you are set on enlisting, then so be it. I am not saying it would be a mistake, I would just suggest that you give consideration to the other option while in college instead of writing it off. Look into the PLC program if you are deciding that you might want to do it after your first couple years in college.

    As an enlisted trigger puller you will go to boot camp (13 weeks), got to SOI/ITB(6 weeks), then straight your unit barely knowing how to patrol and set up a claymore, but with a thorough knowledge of drill, Marine Corps history, how to fire a rifle, MCMAP, how to swim, how to get smoked, and how to follow orders. From there you can pick up Cpl if you are lucky and not in a closed out MOS and hope you are in good enough shape to pass a Recon or STA endoc. It was a little better than this, but you are going to be spending as much time sitting in your room playing XBox, hiking, police calling, or getting volunteered for working parties as you are doing the cool things you are joining to do.

    If you pick a commissioning program, you can go to OCS for 10 weeks where you will do lots of PT, do some drill, Marine Corps history, get to do the high ropes course and actually get something that resembles leadership billets. Then onto 26 weeks of TBS where you learn the basics of nearly every aspect of the Marine Corps. Even if you decide to be a pilot or lawyer you still complete this 6 month school based in infantry tactics.

    You will learn correspondence, how to fire the rifle, pistol, machine guns, convoys, do a week of MOUT with sim rounds, ECP's, swim qual to class 2 or higher, fireteam through platoon level tactics for defense, offense, movement to contact, patrolling, doing tactical decision games, terrorism awareness, weapons capabilities, call for fire/CAS, communications equipment, demo range, leadership, MCMAP, orders writing, planning process, fly in helicopters, mark LZ's, ambushes, just to name a few of the things covered. Then you go on to your job school where you actually learn a trade. If you select infantry you get another 11 weeks of infantry training at IOC and participate in a combined arms exercise before you ever hit the fleet. Immediately upon getting to the fleet you will be handed an experienced SNCO and 37 Marines to lead and plan training for. Your SNCO can continue your training day to day from there until you are far more capable of handling multiple situations than you could ever hope to be after 2 years after enlisting. If you succeed you would like soon become an XO who is in charge of the companies armory and work for the company commander. The advantages are too numerous to explain. Even if you are put into a non-infantry MOS you will be handed responsibility immediately and expected to succeed.

    The best advice I can give you if you disregard everything before is to keep your options open, gain perspective, and learn as much about how your decision will effect your future as you can. Nothing wrong with enlisting or gaining a commission, but after you get your degree if you are only going to spend 4 in a branch of service, officer is the way to go. Being a trigger puller sounded awesome to me from 18-22 as well, but managing and leading trigger pullers is where the true challenge and rewards begin. This goes for being an NCO or commissioned officer, you just get the opportunity earlier as an officer with a lot better training as you go through different basic training to back you. I firmly believe E-1 through E-5's in the military are underpaid, I wish future pay raises would go to them. I stayed in and sought a commission to take care of Marines the way I felt I was shorted when I was in their situation. I am proud of my service, but I wish I had just commissioned at 22 instead of taking the long road here.

    Good luck, and keep on learning. Just my 1/50 of a dollar take it for what it is worth and talk to more people who are doing what you are considering.

  • 3 years ago

    Joining The Military After College

  • angele
    Lv 4
    3 years ago

    Military After College

  • 5 years ago

    In response to your question, Should I join the military after I get my college degree, I can recommend this site http://university-advisor.net/militaryad

    Since you asked, I'm a senior in high school right now, looking forward to going to college. I've always had a sense to join the military, but I really want to become a teacher as well.

    I want to go to college first, and get my degree in either Elementary or Secondary Education, so I'll be able to get a job right away after college. I was thinking about joining the US military AFTER college and spending some time there before spending the rest of my life as a teacher.

    NOTE: I wouldn't be going in the military to try and become an officer, I would be going to be a standard recruit, a trigger puller, and maybe go on to SpecOps or something.

    People are telling me the military will pay for my college, but I don't want to join just yet. I don't wanna commit to the military and then go to college on their dime. I want to go college first and if I still have an interest in the military, I might join it.

    Have a look and you will learn a lot.

    Kind regards,

    Eli

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  • Anonymous
    4 years ago

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    RE:

    Should I join the military after I get my college degree?

    Okay so here's the story.

    I'm a senior in high school right now, looking forward to going to college. I've always had a sense to join the military, but I really want to become a teacher as well.

    I want to go to college first, and get my degree in either Elementary or Secondary...

    Source(s): join military college degree: https://biturl.im/tuovE
  • Nadia
    Lv 4
    4 years ago

    join military college degree

  • Anonymous
    4 years ago

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    I recently got out of the Air Force so I'll give you the information that I know. You're correct that there are a number of ways of going about entering the military and obtaining a degree. If your son wants to pursue his degree now then he should look into a ROTC program. This program allows the individual to go to school on the militarys dollar, while having specific requirements of them during the four year process. Its sort of a premilitary training experience. He will be required to keep up with physical requirements, at the school I go to now one day a week they wear their dress uniform to class and he will be required to attend specific functions. When he has completed his degree he will then owe the military 4-6 years of his time but he will be an Officer in the armed forces rather than enlisted personnel. Biggest benefit here...once hes finished school he'll be paid as an Officer. Another option is to enlist and sign up the Montgomery GI Bill, also referred to as MGIB or just GI Bill. He can enlist for 4-6 years and while at basic training he can choose to sign up for the GI Bill. During the first year of his enlistment $100 a month will be automatically withdrawn from his paycheck and put into an education fund, at the end of his enlistment he can then go to school using the money from this fund. I know that $1200 doesn't sound like much, and it isn't, but the return is fabulous. Those who have signed up and contributed to the MGIB currently have around $40,000 to go to school with. You can go to almost any college or trade school. Once he is accepted to the Univ. he will need to go to the VA office, usually right next to the financial aid office, and fill out some paperwork. When all is said and done he will receive a monthly stipend of $1075 in order to pay for his schooling or living expenses. Most schools will extend the due date for their tuition and fees knowing that the GI Bill pays in the rear so that he will have the entire semester to pay the school what its owed. Keep in mind that while your son is enlisted he can also take classes, online or at the local college, and the service will pay for 100% tuition up to appx $4500 a year. If he has signed up for the GI Bill he can then 'top off' meaning he can tap into his GI Bill money to pay for anything above and beyond the $4500 a year. Also, your son will only have one opportunity to sign up for the GI Bill. If he chooses not to hes out the $40000 to go to school. There is no changing of the mind, no I meant to, nothing, he has to sign up for it while in basic training or hes out. The last option that I can think of is to join the Guard or Reserves. This is something that I'm not very familiar with but my understanding is that they allow you to use GI Bill money without having you pay into it. I'm not sure how you pay this back or if you will then owe the military time but it is something that the two of you can look into together. Good luck to you and your son!

  • lizzie
    Lv 5
    3 years ago

    84

    Source(s): OnlineCollegeFAQs - http://www.askonlinecollege.com
  • HDH
    Lv 7
    10 years ago

    Sure, if you want to do things in that order, you can. It's what I did. I had the Army repay my Federal student loans, so they still paid for college, just in reverse, if that makes any sense. ;)

  • Izzy
    Lv 4
    10 years ago

    "I want to go college first.."

    Answers your question right there.It's your choice.It seems you want to go to college first then the military if your still interested.As I said just do what you WANT to do which is go to college first.

    Wish you the best of luck.

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