What is the origin of my last name?

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My last name is Sincuir.
So far i haven't found anything that can tell me what the origin of my last name is.

Any help?
Thank you! :)
Best Answer
  • Tina answered 4 years ago
Sinclair Surname
The surname of SINCLAIR is a Caithness surname of territorial origin from St. Clare in the Arrondissement of Pont d'Eveque, Normandy. The first Sinclairs in Scotland appear to have been vassals of the great territorial magnates, de Morville. Their first possession in Scotland was the barony of Rolsin, near Edinburgh, which they held in the reign of David I (1124-1153). An early offshoot of the family became all powerful in Caithness and held the earldom there from 1379 to 1542. The Sinclairs were a powerful territorial family whose relationships to their dependants was entirely feudal. The earliest bearers of the name appear in charters connected with the abbeys of Dryburgh and Newbattle, the Hospital of Soltre, and the church of Glasgow. John Singular held land in Aberdeen, circa 1450 and Lasae Saengkaer was the burgomaster of Oddevald in 1504. An old rhyme referring to the bickerings between the Sinclairs and their neighbours says:

'Sinclair, Sutherland, Keith and Clan Gunn There never was peace when Thae four were in'
http://www.4crests.com/sinclair-coat-of-...

Sinclair Name Meaning and History
1. Scottish (of Norman origin): name of a powerful Scottish clan, originally a habitational name from Saint-Clair-sur-Elle in La Manche or Saint-Clair-l’Évêque in Calvados, so called from the dedication of their churches to St. Clarus (see Clare 3).
2. Jewish: Americanized form of some like-sounding Ashkenazic Jewish surname.
Dictionary of American Family Names, Oxford University Press, ISBN 0-19-508137-4
http://www.ancestry.com/facts/Sinclair-f...

Clare Name Meaning and History
1. Irish and English: habitational name from Clare in Suffolk (probably named with a Celtic river name meaning ‘bright’, ‘gentle’, or ‘warm’). One of the first Normans in Ireland (1170–72) was Richard de Clare, Earl of Pembroke, better known as ‘Strongbow’, who took his surname from his estate in Suffolk.
2. English: habitational name from Clare in Oxfordshire, named with Old English cl?g ‘clay’ + ora ‘slope’.
3. English: from the Middle English, Old French female personal name Cla(i)re (Latin Clara, from clarus ‘famous’), which achieved some popularity, greater on the Continent than in England, through the fame of St. Clare of Assisi. See also Sinclair.
4. English: occupational name for a worker in clay, for example someone expert in building in wattle and daub, from Middle English clayere, an agent derivative of Old English cl?g ‘clay’.
Dictionary of American Family Names, Oxford University Press, ISBN 0-19-508137-4
http://www.ancestry.com/facts/Clare-fami...

Surname: Sinclar
This ancient and distinguished surname, having no less than twenty Coats of Arms, and with several notable entries in the "Dictionary of National Biography", is widespread both in England and Scotland, and is a locational name from any of the various places in Normandy, for example Saint-Clair-sur-Elle in La Manche; Saint-Clair-l'Eveque in Calvados, and St. Clare in the arrondissement of Pont d'Eveque, so called from the dedication of their churches to St. Clarus. The Middle English and Old French female given name "Cla(i)re", which derives from the Latin "Clara", itself coming from "clarus", famous, achieved great popularity on the Continent through the fame of St. Clare of Assisi (1194 - 1253), foundress of the Order of Poor Clares. The surname was introduced into England by the Normans after the Conquest of 1066, and has the distinction of being first recorded in the Domesday Book. Other early examples of the surname include: Richard de Sencler (Norfolk, 1086); Ralph de Seintcler (Somerset, 1197); and Emma de Sancler (Kent, 1198). The Scottish Sinclair family, which includes the Earls of Caithness, originally held the Norman barony of Saint-Clair. Sir William Saint-Clair (1240 - 1303), was a leader of a rebellion against Edward 1 of England; his son, Sir Henry Sinclair, fought for Bruce at Bannockburn, and Sir Henry Sinclair was created Prince of Orkney in 1379. The first recorded spelling of the family name is shown to be that of Hubertus de Sancto Claro, which was dated 1086, in the Domesday Book of Somerset, during the reign of King William 1, known as "William the Conqueror", 1066 - 1087. Surnames became necessary when governments introduced personal taxation. In England this was known as Poll Tax. Throughout the centuries, surnames in every country have continued to "develop" often leading to astonishing variants of the original spelling. © Copyright: Name Orgin Research www.surnamedb.com 1980 - 2010 Read more: http://www.surnamedb.com/surname.aspx?na...

The surname Sincuir is of Norman origin and is popular in England and Ireland; it is also one of the many spelling variants of the surname Sinclair.

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  • SK answered 4 years ago
    Quite ancient frankish, if you ask me. I guessed you're of French descent then.
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  • Maxi answered 4 years ago
    I beleive this is a variation to the Sinclair name....
    This ancient and distinguished surname, having no less than twenty Coats of Arms, and with several notable entries in the "Dictionary of National Biography", is widespread both in England and Scotland, and is a locational name from any of the various places in Normandy, for example Saint-Clair-sur-Elle in La Manche; Saint-Clair-l'Eveque in Calvados, and St. Clare in the arrondissement of Pont d'Eveque, so called from the dedication of their churches to St. Clarus. The Middle English and Old French female given name "Cla(i)re", which derives from the Latin "Clara", itself coming from "clarus", famous, achieved great popularity on the Continent through the fame of St. Clare of Assisi (1194 - 1253), foundress of the Order of Poor Clares. The surname was introduced into England by the Normans after the Conquest of 1066, and has the distinction of being first recorded in the Domesday Book. Other early examples of the surname include: Richard de Sencler (Norfolk, 1086); Ralph de Seintcler (Somerset, 1197); and Emma de Sancler (Kent, 1198). The Scottish Sinclair family, which includes the Earls of Caithness, originally held the Norman barony of Saint-Clair. Sir William Saint-Clair (1240 - 1303), was a leader of a rebellion against Edward 1 of England; his son, Sir Henry Sinclair, fought for Bruce at Bannockburn, and Sir Henry Sinclair was created Prince of Orkney in 1379. The first recorded spelling of the family name is shown to be that of Hubertus de Sancto Claro, which was dated 1086, in the Domesday Book of Somerset, during the reign of King William 1, known as "William the Conqueror", 1066 - 1087. Surnames became necessary when governments introduced personal taxation. In England this was known as Poll Tax. Throughout the centuries, surnames in every country have continued to "develop" often leading to astonishing variants of the original spelling.

    Read more: http://www.surnamedb.com/surname.aspx?na...
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