promotion image of download ymail app
Promoted

what is the rotational speed of the earth?

11 Answers

Relevance
  • Favorite Answer

    The speed of the Earth's rotation can be thought of in two ways - the angular speed and the linear speed (of a point on the surface).

    Express the angular speed (traditionally referred to by the Greek letter omega) in radians/sec:

    omega = 360 degrees / 24 hours = 2 * pi radians / (24 * 60 * 60) second

    (pi = 3.14159.....)

    = 7.272 x 10-5 radians/sec = 0.00007272 radians/second

    Now to convert the angular speed to the linear speed of a point on the Earth's surface, multiply omega by the radius of the Earth, R.

    To put it in familiar units, let's express R in miles: R = 3822 miles (roughly). So the linear velocity on the surface V is:

    V = omega * R = 0.00007272 * 3822 = 0.278 miles/second

    or

    V = about 1000 miles/hour (Surprisingly fast!)

    Source(s): Aerospace Engineer in NASA for the past 15 years.
    • Commenter avatarLogin to reply the answers
  • isaias
    Lv 4
    4 years ago

    Rotational Speed Of Earth

    • Commenter avatarLogin to reply the answers
  • Anonymous
    1 decade ago

    The circumference of the Earth at the equator is 25,000 miles. The Earth rotates in about 24 hours. Therefore, if you were to hang above the surface of the Earth at the equator without moving, you would see 25,000 miles pass by in 24 hours, at a speed of 25000/24 or just over 1000 miles per hour.

    • Commenter avatarLogin to reply the answers
  • 1 decade ago

    You said rotational speed (Oh my Gah), right?

    It is the same as how you reckon time zones, that is 15degrees per hour, 1 degree per every 4minutes or 1minute of arc every 4 seconds (= 15 seconds of Arc every 1second of time).

    All these are translatable into Radians of Arc per unit time (like the above) if you multiply degrees by 'pi' and divide by 180. Remember, 1 minute of Arc is 0.0166666 degree & 1 second of Arc is

    0.000277777777 degree.

    The other speed (linear or translatory) varies from '0' at poles to 1035miles/hr at the equator; as

    15deg. => 15 X 69 per hour. {if it is to be nautical miles, it =15 X 60 =900 naut.miles/hour =900 knots}

    • Commenter avatarLogin to reply the answers
  • How do you think about the answers? You can sign in to vote the answer.
  • 1 decade ago

    As a whole once per day. The actual velocity of a point on the Earth depends on the Latitude. In case you need a formula, try this: [cos(Latitude) X Earth's Diameter X 3.14159]/24 = velocity at that latitude.

    • Commenter avatarLogin to reply the answers
  • 1 decade ago

    What do you mean?

    Rotations per unit of time (~365.24 rotations/year)?

    Angular velocity (~2294.87radians/year)?

    Linear speed of the surface of the Earth at the equator relative to the center of the Earth (~2.33*10^9 m/year)?

    Source(s): I thought years were a nice unit of time to use.
    • Commenter avatarLogin to reply the answers
  • 1 decade ago

    It depends upon where you're standing. If you're standing on the equator, it's about one thousand miles per hour. If you're standing on the north pole or the south pole, it's zero miles per hour. If you are standing somewhere between the poles and the equator, it will be something between zero and 1000 miles per hour. That's why the Kennedy Space Center launches the space shuttle in Florida instead of Rhode Island or Maine; it gets an extra boost in speed by being closer to the equator.

    • Commenter avatarLogin to reply the answers
  • Tom S
    Lv 7
    1 decade ago

    About 0.0006944 RPM

    • Commenter avatarLogin to reply the answers
  • 1 decade ago

    just over 1000 mph

    • Commenter avatarLogin to reply the answers
  • 1 decade ago

    300gigs

    • Commenter avatarLogin to reply the answers
Still have questions? Get your answers by asking now.