Why are some drugs prescription and some are on the shelves?

Are the prescription drugs more dangerous?

Also, why don't you need a prescription for herbal remedies?

2 Answers

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  • 10 years ago
    Favorite Answer

    Certain drugs can only be legally obtained by someone with a doctor's prescription. All drugs that are Scheduled II, III, and IV usually require a prescription according to Federal law. These drugs are deemed to have addictive properties, which is why they are kept out of reach of just anybody.

    However, people will find ways to get high off shelf pharmaceuticals anyways. Alcoholics sometimes abuse Listerine (very dangerous for your liver) to get drunk, regardless of how much it takes to actually achieve anything near a buzz. These people are likely on Death Row by then, according to their health. Some experimenters also drink certain brands of cough syrup because in large amounts, the active chemical, DXM, can act as a hallucinogen.

    Herbal remedies do not require a prescription in most cases, with the exception of Cannabis (commonly known as Marijuana). This is a result of over half a century of scandal, lies, government propaganda, and business interests.

  • Lea
    Lv 7
    10 years ago

    It is an issue of risk and self care. The rule for an OTC drug is that it must be very safe and people are able to use safely without consulting a prescriber. Prescription drugs do not meet that criteria. For instance, if you take a lot of Tums, you might actually end up with a stomach ache. It will not kill you. Take too much warfarin, and you will bleed to death. The last drug to be reviewed for OTC status but not to make it was low dose lovastatin, I believe. The FDA could not be convinced that the average person could safely take it. The newest OTC drug is Zegerid. It is a PPI with an antacid.

    Herbal remedies are not considered drugs. They are categorized as food items. This is a highly political issue.

    Source(s): pharmacist
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