Germs can penetrate the eyes, but bacterial infections in the eye are relatively rare. Why is this?

Germs can penetrate the eyes, but bacterial infections in the eye are relatively rare. Why is this?

Blinking crushes bacteria that try to enter the eye.

Eyelashes act as shields preventing germs from entering the eye.

Tears, which constantly wash over the eye, contain an anti-bacterial enzyme.

The number of bacteria that can actually infect the eye is quite small.

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  • 10 years ago
    Favorite Answer

    Blinking does not crush bacteria. Bacteria are too small and can slip into the eye even when it's closed.

    Eyelashes might shield larger debris from entering the eye but not bacteria. Again... they're too small, and eye infections are usually spread by the fingers anyway.

    Tears are probably the best bet to why eye infections are rare. I'm not sure about the anti-bacterial enzyme although I don't doubt this concept, but salinity and the fact that they're constantly flushing and draining the eye's surface probably has something to do with it also.

    I'm sure there are a plethora of bacteria that can infect the eye. Our bodies are just built to defend themselves against them since we evolved with these bacteria.

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  • Erika
    Lv 4
    3 years ago

    Rare Eye Infections

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  • 4 years ago

    any form of bacterial infection can be spread and is usually contagious when there is fever present even if it is a low grade one. Here is a suggestion. If you or someone you know has an eye infection one thing that you need to make sure that you do is keep your hands washed as much as possible when you are around people or that person is around you. You would be surprised that many of the viruses as well as bacterial are spreaded by touch. Also if you come in contact of bodily fluids make sure to wash your hands before you touch anything on your face.

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  • 10 years ago

    Except blinking does not "crush" the bacteria but acts as a shield to filter out larger particles that may harm the eye you answered your own question..........tears keep the eye bathed and continually wash away irritants.

    Also, why when you do get an infection you have an "excess" of tears to clear the infection away.

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  • 10 years ago

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