Anonymous
Anonymous asked in Science & MathematicsBiology · 10 years ago

What's the law of biogenesis?

I'm writing an essay on the origin of life and my friend told me I could prove Creationism with the Law of Biogenesis. But she got it from a book and so there's no link and when I looked it up online my computer picked up a virus. And no one will take me to the library. I give up!

Can someone explain the law of biogenesis to me? Can I prove the exsistance of a creator with it?

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  • 10 years ago
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    1. The so-called "law of biogenesis" came from the refutation of an outdated idea about the origin of life: that outdated idea is called spontaneous generation.

    Spontaneous generation held that organisms - even those as complex as flies, rats, and frogs - could just spontaneously arise in a few days or weeks, and that complex life arising goes on all the time, all around us, under all kinds of conditions, throughout history. Several scientists started chipping away at that notion and Loius Pasteur drove the final nail in the coffin of spontaneous generation.

    The modern view of the origin of life is abiogenesis, not spontaneous generation. In abiogensis, the first life would have been far far far far far far far far far far simpler than the simplest prokaryote alive today, would have taken possibly tens of millions of years to arise, would have arisen only once, and would have involved conditions unlike those present on today's earth. The experiments that refuted spontaneous generation don't even touch abiogenesis.

    So no, the "law of biogenesis" does not refute abiogenesis.

    2. It is a misnomer to speak of a scientific law of biogenesis. The closest thing to it is the part of the cell theory which states that all cells arise from preexisting cells. But then that is nothing more than an inductive conclusion: every cell we've even seen arise arose from a preexisting cell, so it is inductively concluded that that applies to all cells. But, there is no logical requirement that it apply to all cells: it's an extrapolation. There are untold numbers of similar inductive conclusions that were later proven false in science. For example, for decades biologists had not found any prokaryote that had a cytoskeleton so it was taught that no prokaryotes have a cytoskeleon: but then we found some prokaryotes that do have a cytoskeleton.

    So no, one cannot prove the existence of a creator with the so-called "law of biogenesis."

    PS: Besides, the Creator would be astronomically greater than the first living organism, right? So it would be more logical to accept that life just existed without a cause than it would be to accept that a Creator just existed without a cause. Calling upon a Creator does not solve anything: it just makes things worse. It replaces one mystery with an every bigger one.

  • Jane
    Lv 4
    4 years ago

    You're forgetting the context. Biogenesis is pretty reliable now, because we are immersed in a soup of life. There are huge numbers of bacteria in a teaspoon of soil. It takes complex chemical "cookery" to produce even the most primitive forms of life, and long before the job would be finished, some bacterium would come along and scarf up those useful nutrients, because they're convenient for sustaining ITS life. But if no life were around, then there would be nothing to interfere with chemistry, and slow, complicated chemical processes would proceed uninterrupted. Under these conditions, life might eventually result. We're not sure of the sequence of events; several possible sequences have been proposed, and we're not even sure if parts of the process happened on this planet or somewhere else. (There's a constant supply of interplanetary material coming to earth, you know.) The biogenesis assumption has even been called into question. Some scientists have been considering the possibility of fresh life forms being generated in certain extreme environments. Trouble is, they'd have to develop quite a bit to avoid getting eaten by the life already here, so it's hard to be sure. Biogenesis is only practical as a principle for dealing with questions like whether something that was supposed to be sterile really WAS sterile. And for those cases, there's no question at all, because the conditions for controlled sterility don't allow the complex chemical reactions to start in the first place.

  • 4 years ago

    This Site Might Help You.

    RE:

    What's the law of biogenesis?

    I'm writing an essay on the origin of life and my friend told me I could prove Creationism with the Law of Biogenesis. But she got it from a book and so there's no link and when I looked it up online my computer picked up a virus. And no one will take me to the library. I give up!

    Can...

    Source(s): 39 law biogenesis: https://shortly.im/SLPkl
  • 6 years ago

    go to apologeticspress.org for a reasoned explanation

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