What are the different types of nationalism? (see details)?

Ok, don't say I didn't do my homework, because I did. But I'm having some trouble with understanding the differences between the different types of nationalism. I looked through my textbook but they don't explain it in a clear enough way for me to understand. Could someone please explain to me the... show more Ok, don't say I didn't do my homework, because I did. But I'm having some trouble with understanding the differences between the different types of nationalism. I looked through my textbook but they don't explain it in a clear enough way for me to understand. Could someone please explain to me the differences between these types? I'm including an excerpt of my book so you can see what exactly I'm getting at.

"Types of nationalism:

Nationalism may manifest itself as part of official state ideology or as a popular (non-state) movement and may be expressed along civic, ethnic, cultural, religious or ideological lines. These self-definitions of the nation are used to classify types of nationalism. However such categories are not mutually exclusive and many nationalist movements combine some or all of these elements to varying degrees. Nationalist movements can also be classified by other criteria, such as scale and location.

Civic nationalism is the form of nationalism in which the state derives political legitimacy from the active participation of its citizenry, from the degree to which it represents the "will of the people". As a form of nationalism it is contrasted with ethnic nationalism. Membership of the civic nation is considered voluntary. Civic-national ideals influenced the development of representative democracy in countries such as the United States and France.

Ethnic nationalism defines the nation in terms of ethnicity, which always includes some element of descent from previous generations. It also includes ideas of a culture shared between members of the group and with their ancestors, and usually a shared language. Membership in the nation is hereditary. The state derives political legitimacy from its status as homeland of the ethnic group, and from its function to protect the national group and facilitate its cultural and social life, as a group. Ethnic nationalism is now the dominant form.

Romantic nationalism reflected the ideals of Romanticism and was opposed to Enlightenment rationalism. Romantic nationalism emphasized a historical ethnic culture which meets the Romantic Ideal; folklore developed as a Romantic nationalist concept.

Cultural nationalism defines the nation by shared culture. Membership in the nation is neither voluntary (you cannot instantly acquire a culture), nor hereditary (children of members may be considered foreigners if they grew up in another culture). Chinese nationalism is one example of cultural nationalism, partly because of the many national minorities in China. (The 'Chinese nationalists' include those in Taiwan who reject the mainland Chinese government but claim the mainland Chinese state).

State nationalism is a variant on civic nationalism, very often combined with ethnic nationalism. It implies that the nation is a community of those who contribute to the maintenance and strength of the state, and that the individual exists to contribute to this goal. Italian fascism is the best example, epitomized in this slogan of Mussolini: "Everything in the State, nothing outside the State, nothing against the State".

Religious nationalism defines the nation in terms of shared religion. If the state derives political legitimacy from adherence to religious doctrines, then it may be more of a theocracy than a nation-state. In practice, much ethnic and cultural nationalism is in some way religious. The religion is usually a marker of group identity, rather than the motivation for nationalist claims. For example, Irish nationalism is associated with Catholicism. Most Irish nationalist leaders of the last 100 years were Catholic, but many of the early (18th century) nationalists were Protestant. Irish nationalism never centered on theological distinctions.

Similarly, although Religious Zionism exists, the mainstream of Zionism is more secular in nature, and based on culture and ethnicity. Since India gained independence, Indian nationalism has been associated with Hinduism. In modern India, a contemporary form of Hindu nationalism, or Hindutva has been prominent among some groups.

Diaspora nationalism (or, as Benedict Anderson terms it, "long-distance nationalism") generally refers to nationalist feeling among a diaspora. A diaspora refers to any people forced or induced to leave their traditional ethnic homelands. African-Americans in the U.S. are a part of the African diaspora, along with other Africa-rooted people throughout the world. Other diaspora include the Irish in the United States and the Lebanese in the Americas and Africa.

Anderson states that Diaspora nationalism acts as a "phantom bedrock" for people who want to experience a national connection, but who do not actually want to leave their diaspora community."

Thanks so much! :)
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